foxaveclocs:

fuckyourracism:

nuclearvomitbabe:

distortnoise:

hekatiia:

stayuglystayangry:

for-an-anarchist-hyrule:

anirishginger:

can’t say i approve of those dreads, but i’m envious of that grim bag

white peopledreads:facepalm
Manx Sheep skull, high five!

seconded all-around

a) I don’t give two fucks what you think of my hairstyle; also you don’t know what you’re talking about;
b) It’s not a Manx sheep it’s a Jacob sheep get your fucking old world Ovidae straight you puerile little shits.

People who make cultural appropriation comments about white people with dreads are uneducated idiots. Saxons, Celts, Picts, Vikings and many other european cultures had dreadlocks centuries before rastafarian was invented. Not to mention several other races/cultures including native americans and egyptians also had dreadlocks. Plus im pretty sure no divine being came down and gave a copyright on dreadlocks or any other hairstyle to any specific group or race… also your hair looks amazing so who cares.

^ finally someone said it.

Yes, finally an uneducated person will use their ignorance to defend white dreads. It’s about time. It’s totally never happened before.

Native Americans do not have “dreadlocks”. Some southwestern native men twisted their hair into long hair rolls and stiffened them with clay and paint. Just because that looks like dreadlocks doesn’t mean they are.
Picts, Gallic, and Celtic hairstyles were absolutely not dreadlocks. There were traditions of matting, plaiting, and braiding hair. For Celtics, they were called gleebs (or glibs) which were matted and then caked with mud or clay. For Gauls, they were noted for always washing their hair in limewater to make it heavy and coarse. Again, looks like =/= actually is. Vikings were exceptionally clean and washed their hair and beards daily and used a multitude of combs and other personal grooming tools. 
White people wanna make these claims to justify their dreadlocks but yet not know the actual history of their hair. Funny how that is.

^^^^^

foxaveclocs:

fuckyourracism:

nuclearvomitbabe:

distortnoise:

hekatiia:

stayuglystayangry:

for-an-anarchist-hyrule:

anirishginger:

can’t say i approve of those dreads, but i’m envious of that grim bag

white peopledreads:facepalm

Manx Sheep skull, high five!

seconded all-around

a) I don’t give two fucks what you think of my hairstyle; also you don’t know what you’re talking about;

b) It’s not a Manx sheep it’s a Jacob sheep get your fucking old world Ovidae straight you puerile little shits.

People who make cultural appropriation comments about white people with dreads are uneducated idiots. Saxons, Celts, Picts, Vikings and many other european cultures had dreadlocks centuries before rastafarian was invented. Not to mention several other races/cultures including native americans and egyptians also had dreadlocks. Plus im pretty sure no divine being came down and gave a copyright on dreadlocks or any other hairstyle to any specific group or race… also your hair looks amazing so who cares.

^ finally someone said it.

Yes, finally an uneducated person will use their ignorance to defend white dreads. It’s about time. It’s totally never happened before.

Native Americans do not have “dreadlocks”. Some southwestern native men twisted their hair into long hair rolls and stiffened them with clay and paint. Just because that looks like dreadlocks doesn’t mean they are.

Picts, Gallic, and Celtic hairstyles were absolutely not dreadlocks. There were traditions of matting, plaiting, and braiding hair. For Celtics, they were called gleebs (or glibs) which were matted and then caked with mud or clay. For Gauls, they were noted for always washing their hair in limewater to make it heavy and coarse. Again, looks like =/= actually is. Vikings were exceptionally clean and washed their hair and beards daily and used a multitude of combs and other personal grooming tools. 

White people wanna make these claims to justify their dreadlocks but yet not know the actual history of their hair. Funny how that is.

^^^^^

(via pardonmewhileipanic)

(Source: onepointeight, via bloomwilde)

  • Men's Rights Activists: THIS IS NOT FAIR. MEN HAVE PROBLEMS TOO.
  • Black Men: We're constantly demonized by mainstream media and are targets of police brutality.
  • Gay Men: We face discrimination and hatred and are denied marriage and job security.
  • Trans Men: We are outcasts and are denied medical care, our lives are constantly under threat and our gender is always under scrutiny and policed by others.
  • Men's Rights Activist: ....
  • ...
  • ...
  • ...
  • Men's Right Activist: Y-Yeah, but... a Feminist was mean to me...

(Source: sandandglass, via kiddotrue)

nativeundercover:

Finally, I made myself a new fundraiser, with indiegogo this time.

More or less, exactly what it says on the label. I need a shit-tonne of money to pay for a wheelchair. The pain from walking is even worse now than during my original fundraiser (which was shut down due to the fact I can’t prove my identity adequately, which paypal requires as per bizarre Australian law, but now I’m using a different account).

If you can’t donate, please share.

Thank you.

(via madgastronomer)

smallrevolutionary:

black-american-queen:

OK. I KNOW YOU ARE ALL WORRIED ABOUT FERGUSON BUT CAN YOU FOR A SECOND LOOK AT THIS VICTOR WHITE CASE?

NOTHING ADDS UP.

APPARENTLY AFTER BEING SEARCHED TWICE (while handcuffed) HE PRODUCED A GUN AT THE POLICE STATION AND SHOT HIMSELF. HIS DEATH HAS BEEN RULED A SUICIDE.

YOU NEED TO SPREAD THIS TUMBLR. BECAUSE THIS IS BULLSHIT AND THE COPS ARE COVERING IT UP.

boosting this again. all this shit needs scrutiny. thats the only way we will get the reform we are literally dying to get.

(via broadlybrazen)

freececemcdonald:

"Trans women are getting killed EVERYDAY & you think the struggle is over because you can put a ring on a finger?!"-CeCe McDonald

freececemcdonald:

"Trans women are getting killed EVERYDAY & you think the struggle is over because you can put a ring on a finger?!"
-CeCe McDonald

(via queerandpresentdanger)

fuckyeahlgbtqartists:

The New Black Official Trailer


The New Black is a documentary that tells the story of how the African-American community is grappling with the gay rights issue in light of the recent gay marriage movement and the fight over civil rights. newblackfilm.com, @newblackfilm

(via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Image AP Photo/Damian DovarganesA Los Angeles Police officer wears an on-body camera, similar to the ones implemented in Ferguson, Mo., during a demonstration for media in Los Angeles.  (AP PHOTO/DAMIAN DOVARGANES)

Police officers in Ferguson began wearing body cameras over the weekend, as residents continue to protest the fatal police shooting of an unarmed teenager three weeks earlier.

About 50 body cameras were donated by two security firms, Safety Vision and Digital Ally, last week, after talks with the Ferguson Police Department in response to differing stories coming out the of the shooting on Aug. 9 of Michael Brown Jr. by Ferguson officer Darren Wilson.

Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson said that officers are adjusting to working with body cameras, but that the overall response is positive now that nearly the entire department has been trained.

“They are really enjoying them,” Jackson told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “They are trying to get used to using them.”

More than 150,000 Americans have petitioned the White House to create the Mike Brown Law, which would require all state, county and local police officers to wear body cameras. 

Source: Allen McDuffee for The Wire

(via kyssthis16)

cadenceabsolutely:

My new ig series: How to Draw… A Corgi ;P

cadenceabsolutely:

My new ig series: How to Draw…
A Corgi ;P

(via thefrogman)

fabulouslyfreespirited:

If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies.
In what’s being called the biggest celebrity hacking incident in internet history, more than 100 female celebrities have had their private nude images stolen and published online. The bulk of the images posted have been officially confirmed as belonging to Jennifer Lawrence, but a complete list of victims’ names - including Krysten Ritter, Kate Upton, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Rihanna, Brie Larson and Kirsten Dunst - has been subsequently published. (Link does not contain pictures, only names.)
The images were first uploaded by an anonymous member of the underground internet sewer known as 4chan and have since been enthusiastically shared across platforms like Reddit and Twitter. A representative for Lawrence has confirmed the images are real, condemning the theft of them as a “flagrant violation of privacy” and adding that “The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos.”
There are a few different issues that a criminal act like this brings up, but before I get into them it’s necessary to make one thing clear: If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies. These images - which I have not seen and which I will not look for - are intimate, private moments belonging only to the people who appear in them and who they have invited to see them. To have those moments stolen and broadcast to the world is an egregious act of psychic violence which constitutes a form of assault.
The people sharing these images are perpetuating an ongoing assault. The people gleefully looking at them are witnessing and enjoying an ongoing assault. When you have been asked by victims of a crime like this not to exacerbate the pain of that crime and you continue to do so anyway, you are consciously deciding that your enjoyment, your rights and perhaps even just your curiosity are more important than the safety and dignity of the people you’re exploiting.
That out of the way, let’s get a few other things straight.
1. This is not a ‘scandal’
It’s a crime, and we should be discussing it as such. Some media outlets are salaciously reporting it otherwise, as if the illegal violation of privacy involving intimate images is little more than subject for gossip. When associated with sex, the word ‘scandal’ has been typically interpreted as something that assigns responsibility to all parties involved, a consensual act unfortunately discovered and for which everyone owes an explanation or apology. Remember when private nude photos of Vanessa Hudgens (whose name also appears on the list of victims) were leaked online and Disney forced her to publicly apologise for her “lapse in judgment” and hoped she had “learned a valuable lesson”? Never mind that Hudgens was an adult and a victim of privacy violation - the ‘scandal’ was painted as something for which she owed her fans an apology. Which leads us to:
2. These women do not ‘only have themselves to blame’
While depressing, it’s sadly unsurprising to see some people arguing that Lawrence et al brought this on themselves. Part of living in a rape culture is the ongoing expectation that women are responsible for protecting themselves from abuse, and that means avoiding behaviour which might be later ‘exploited’ by the people who are conveniently never held to account for their actions. But women are entitled to consensually engage in their sexuality any way they see fit. If that involves taking nude self portraits for the enjoyment of themselves or consciously selected others, that’s their prerogative.
Victims of crime do not have an obligation to accept dual responsibility for that crime. Women who take nude photographs of themselves are not committing a criminal act, and they shouldn’t ‘expect’ to become victims to one, as actress Mary E. Winstead pointed out on Twitter. 
Sending a photograph of your breasts to one person isn’t consenting to having the whole world see those breasts, just as consenting to sex with one person isn’t the same as giving permission for everyone else to fu*k you. Victim blaming isn’t okay, even if it does give you a private thrill to humiliate the female victims of sexual exploitation.
3. It doesn’t matter that ‘damn, she looks good and should own it!’
Stealing and sharing the private photographs of women doesn’t become less of a crime just because you approve them for fapping activity. I’m sure many of the women on this list are confident of their sexual attractiveness. It doesn’t mean they don’t value their privacy or shouldn’t expect to enjoy the same rights to it as everyone else. It also doesn’t mean they want strangers sweating over their images. That line of thinking comes from the same school which instructs women to either ignore of welcome sexual harassment when it’s seemingly ‘positive’ in its sentiments.
None of these women are likely to give a shit that you think their bodies are ‘tight, damn’. Despite what society reinforces to us about the public ownership of women’s bodies, we are not entitled to co-opt and objectify them just because we think we can defend it as a compliment.
I will not be seeking out these images out and I urge everyone else to avoid doing the same. I hope that all the women who have been victimised here are being appropriately supported by the authorities and their network of friends. And I hope sincerely that more people take a stand against this kind of behaviour.
Because this incident aside, it strikes me as deeply ironic that we will vehemently protest a free Facebook messenger app because we’re outraged at reports that it can access our phone’s numbers, and yet turn around and excuse the serving up of women’s bodies for our own pleasure. Our appreciation is no less disgusting just because it’s accompanied by the sound of one hand clapping.

(via cindyscissorhands)

riotsnotdiets:

It’s not every day you find out that you’re gonna really for real get to marry your favorite human. I love you @chead! ❤️💖🍑👯😘🎉💝

I’m going to say how happy I am for both of you on ALL THE SOCIAL MEDIA.SO happy! *throws glitter* Woo!

riotsnotdiets:

It’s not every day you find out that you’re gonna really for real get to marry your favorite human. I love you @chead! ❤️💖🍑👯😘🎉💝

I’m going to say how happy I am for both of you on ALL THE SOCIAL MEDIA.

SO happy! *throws glitter* Woo!

janetmock:

Janet Mock on Beyoncé’s feminism.

We can be sexual, sexy and flawless while advocating and fighting and educating and uplifting and critiquing and challenging and giving and everything.

(Source: thequeenbey, via black--candy)