For those who are unaware, Joumana Kayrouz is a badass. 
Just a few days older than 50, Joumana Kayrouz may offer one of the most compelling portraits of the American Dream that southeast Michigan has to offer. In the midst of the 30-year Lebanese civil war, she arrived in the United States with $1,000 in her pocket, half a college education and limited English language skills. Since then, she has built the second-largest personal injury law firm in Michigan, employing about 70 people, including a large team of lawyers. It’s the only major personal injury law firm in Michigan owned by a woman, and wields an advertising budget of approximately $4.3 million dollars a year. She holds a degree in ethics from Yale University, speaks four languages — English, Arabic, French and Italian, and is flawless in all but the last — and metro Detroiters can see her face on more than 750 billboards and buses, the wallpaper of the city. 
She is probably also the most visible Arab-American in southeast Michigan — an area of the world with one of the largest Arab populations outside the Middle East. She’s been a trailblazer in her profession, one traditionally dominated by white Jewish men, and to many who know her, she’s a quiet feminist icon. She serves as a cultural ambassador between Lebanon and the United States, and is an enormous donor to progressive politicians, especially those who advocate for the rights of women. She gives approximately 20 percent of her wealth to charity, tithing in accordance to her profoundly felt religion, and serves as a role model to many in the legal profession and the immigrant and Arab-American communities in Detroit.

For those who are unaware, Joumana Kayrouz is a badass. 

Just a few days older than 50, Joumana Kayrouz may offer one of the most compelling portraits of the American Dream that southeast Michigan has to offer. In the midst of the 30-year Lebanese civil war, she arrived in the United States with $1,000 in her pocket, half a college education and limited English language skills. Since then, she has built the second-largest personal injury law firm in Michigan, employing about 70 people, including a large team of lawyers. It’s the only major personal injury law firm in Michigan owned by a woman, and wields an advertising budget of approximately $4.3 million dollars a year. She holds a degree in ethics from Yale University, speaks four languages — English, Arabic, French and Italian, and is flawless in all but the last — and metro Detroiters can see her face on more than 750 billboards and buses, the wallpaper of the city. 

She is probably also the most visible Arab-American in southeast Michigan — an area of the world with one of the largest Arab populations outside the Middle East. She’s been a trailblazer in her profession, one traditionally dominated by white Jewish men, and to many who know her, she’s a quiet feminist icon. She serves as a cultural ambassador between Lebanon and the United States, and is an enormous donor to progressive politicians, especially those who advocate for the rights of women. She gives approximately 20 percent of her wealth to charity, tithing in accordance to her profoundly felt religion, and serves as a role model to many in the legal profession and the immigrant and Arab-American communities in Detroit.

poonanji:

see terms:
daddy issues
friend zoned
jail bait

poonanji:

see terms:

  • daddy issues
  • friend zoned
  • jail bait

(Source: cheyennekaris, via fattyforever)

ethiopienne:

Sonia Sotomayor delivers blistering dissent against affirmative action ban

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on affirmative action Tuesday, but not without a blistering dissent from Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
Sotomayor said the decision infringed upon groups’ rights by allowing Michigan voters to change “the basic rules of the political process … in a manner that uniquely disadvantaged racial minorities.”
"In my colleagues’ view, examining the racial impact of legislation only perpetuates racial discrimination," Sotomayor added. “This refusal to accept the stark reality that race matters is regrettable. As members of the judiciary tasked with intervening to carry out the guarantee of equal protection, we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society.”
The court’s 6-2 decision upheld a voter-approved change to the Michigan state Constitution that prevents public colleges from using race as a factor in its admissions. As the AP noted, the ruling provides a boost for other education-related affirmative action bans in California and Washington state.
ABC News pointed out that Sotomayor has been open about the role affirmative action has played in her personal life. In her memoir “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor wrote that it “opened doors” for her.
"But one thing has not changed: to doubt the worth of minority students’ achievement when they succeed is really only to present another face of the prejudice that would deny them a chance even to try," she wrote.
Read Sotomayor’s full dissent here.

ethiopienne:

Sonia Sotomayor delivers blistering dissent against affirmative action ban

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on affirmative action Tuesday, but not without a blistering dissent from Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Sotomayor said the decision infringed upon groups’ rights by allowing Michigan voters to change “the basic rules of the political process … in a manner that uniquely disadvantaged racial minorities.”

"In my colleagues’ view, examining the racial impact of legislation only perpetuates racial discrimination," Sotomayor added. “This refusal to accept the stark reality that race matters is regrettable. As members of the judiciary tasked with intervening to carry out the guarantee of equal protection, we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society.”

The court’s 6-2 decision upheld a voter-approved change to the Michigan state Constitution that prevents public colleges from using race as a factor in its admissions. As the AP noted, the ruling provides a boost for other education-related affirmative action bans in California and Washington state.

ABC News pointed out that Sotomayor has been open about the role affirmative action has played in her personal life. In her memoir “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor wrote that it “opened doors” for her.

"But one thing has not changed: to doubt the worth of minority students’ achievement when they succeed is really only to present another face of the prejudice that would deny them a chance even to try," she wrote.

Read Sotomayor’s full dissent here.

(via kyssthis16)

Lupita Nyong’o Is People Magazine’s Most Beautiful and Has Great Perspectives On Beauty Politics

gradientlair:

Lupita Nyong’o is on the cover of People as the most beautiful person for 2014 in their annual “50 Most Beautiful” issue. This is the first time that anyone of her complexion has made the cover and she’s only the third Black woman to make the cover, other than Halle Berry (2003) and Beyoncé (2012). 

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She shared some insights on beauty in a behind the scenes video for the shoot for this cover. She made some really wonderful statements, some of which I included below:

The first person to tell me that I was beautiful was definitely my mother. She said that a lot, especially when I felt the least bit beautiful which is, you know, as an adolescent you go through times when you feel ugly in general. But my mother always said I was beautiful and I finally believed her at some point.

She’s regularly cited her mother as one of her main supporters in terms of fostering her self-esteem in her beauty, inside and out. She mentioned the importance of being content and I truly believe a part of her allure is her joy. It comes through in her every action and it’s beautiful where it just compliments her glorious dark skin, emotive hopeful eyes, adorable nose, incredible smile, and edges of the gawds, all on a remarkable symmetrical face. 

I feel most beautiful when I am content. That for me is more important than my physical presentation because it’s through inner contentment and happiness that I care about my presentation.

In the behind the scenes video, she also mentioned the role of laughter in her adult life and this definitely connects to the previous quote in terms of internal contentment being the origin for feeling beautiful.

I think the older I get, the more I laugh. I think I’ve laughed a lot in ways; I wish I remembered to laugh like that when I was a teenager.

This made me think of the carefree Black girl conception that many Black women talk about and it made me happy to hear her discuss the role of laughter. An internal source of joy and confidence in appearance are radical acts for Black women in a society that regularly denies us joy and beauty. I am acutely aware of how people hate Black women and also want us to hate ourselves. This dehumanization isn’t just emotional and interpersonal but is a foundation on which oppressions such as misogynoir and colourism rest on. There are people invested—deeply in fact—in not only Lupita being invisible but that no one find her beautiful. They’re terrified that the status quo may shift even a little. And it wouldn’t be a complete shift. Lupita is still very well educated, from a Black immigrant middle class two-parent family and is thin in accordance with most Hollywood standards, so there are elements of privilege as well.

Even so, that beautiful dark skin on the cover will be a problem for many. There have been Black men heavily invested in making sure no one believes she’s beautiful. This isn’t completely about the cishet Black male gaze in a sexual context, though a factor, but also about how it shifts some cishet Black men’s worldview where they may have nothing but “at least” they aren’t Black women. If Black women are to be loathed, Black men can justify their misogynoir as simply being what everyone else feels about us, and it is what everyone else feels about us. Black men did not invent the hatred of Black women nor do they enact it alone. However, if Black women are not to be loathed and some are even deemed beautiful and valuable—even the ones who don’t meet every Eurocentric bullet point in terms of what “beauty” is—then it shifts the ground for many Black men whose choices and gaze are shaped by misogynoir that remains unchecked. This presents a conflict for them and some have lashed out because of it.

There’s also the issue of the White Gaze where even suggesting that a Black woman is beautiful upsets Whites who think that then means White women are being called “ugly.” They purposely ignore the structural power and privilege difference and even the exposure scale differences in the mainstream for White women versus Black women. When I wrote Yeah, Black Women Are Great. Fin., I made it clear that Black women need the space to celebrate our beauty (and not just aesthetically, though yes, that matters as well when our exterior and interior qualities are degraded on the hour) without the White supremacist notion that not reifying Eurocentric beauty standards at every moment means Black women are somehow “harming” White women or any non-Black women. (The latter can be anti-Black at times and placed “above” Black women, as non-Black women of colour, in terms of beauty, but placed “below” White women. Then there’s the intraracial manifestation of colourism where some light skinned Black women may also reject this cover or dark Black women being considered beautiful as well.)

I’m also aware of those among us Black people who think this cover is as simple as “White approval” yet do not understand how visibility as fully human and recognition matters in the mainstream even as Black people create our own media. This is not an “either/or” situation but a “both/and” one. Representation among the mainstream—as it shapes media, politics and culture, which means it has a great deal of power—is not the desire for interpersonal White favor. It’s the desire for the affirmation of humanity so that we are not punished for not being viewed as human. We may not need Whites’ “approval” of us in the mainstream but we most certainly cannot afford Whites’ dehumanization of us in the mainstream. 

While I am not a fan of People and I most certainly don’t read it regularly, I’m also aware of what representation means. Lupita mentioned the importance of representation for Black girls, especially, in a previous speech at Essence Magazine’s 7th Annual Black Women In Hollywood luncheon:

And so I hope that my presence on your screens and in the magazines may lead you, young girl, on a similar journey. That you will feel the validation of your external beauty but also get to the deeper business of being beautiful inside. There is no shame in Black beauty.

Representation as human, as beautiful and as relevant matters for Black women, especially dark Black women (in this case; in other cases Black trans women, fat Black women etc.). Lupita can have this moment without the suggestion that it somehow “harms” Black men (as if their gaze has to matter to Black women at all times) or White women (as if they cannot love themselves unless Black women hate ourselves; well…hmm), without the suggestion that it means Black people no longer care about the media and content that we create ourselves (because let’s be crystal clear here, the mainstream pilfers Black creativity and culture anyway) or any other nonsensical or cruel suggestion meant to harm Black women that everyone was taught to hate. Lupita is clearly at a point of a great deal of self-love. A lot of Black women are. And we deserve to be. 

I hope Lupita continues to thrive in her career (the acting one); I look forward to seeing her in any visual media (even as small as her Instagram). This People announcement as “Most Beautiful” made Lupita happy, as she tweeted, so I am (and many people are) happy for her. Congrats to Lupita Nyong’o. 

Related Essay Compilation: On Beauty Politics

Related Post: Black Women Do Not Have To Reject Any Mention Of Beauty To Be Womanist/Feminist

dynastylnoire:

naturalprose:

dynastylnoire:

im-so-done:

wendys:

 

Outfit Of The Day– with a tasty accessory to match. Make your own New Salad Collection-inspired style for a chance to win $1,000 at http://Polyvore.com/Wendys

Wendy’s is doing way too much with these salads bruh

what is even going on right now

Trying to appeal to the wimminz with clothes and salads.

>.>

Wendy’s I am disappoint.

wendys if my salad doesn’t come with those shoes I’m not interested in this advertisement.

Pretty sure if I can afford that outfit I’m not going to be getting my salads at Wendy’s. I’m going to go somewhere I can wear it.

(via fatgirlopinions)

snarkbender:

maghrabiyya:

ok after i reblogged that last post i had to go download some of Jolipunk's photography to post on my blog

i love the ‘Fucking Tourists!’ series with. a. passion.

here for this

(via girljanitor)

"To say, “I was triggered” is not to say, as it is frequently mischaracterized, “I got my delicate fee-fees hurt.” It is to say, “I had a significantly mood-altering experience of anxiety.” Someone who is triggered may experience anything from a brief moment of dizziness, to a shortness of breath and a racing pulse, to a full-blown panic attack. Speaking about trigger warnings as though they exist for the purposes of indulging fragile sensibilities fundamentally misses their purpose: To mitigate harm."

Shakesville: Triggered (via garlic-knot)

(via sleepydumpling)

travelry:

Today I went to the cup noodle factory (& museum) in Osaka, Japan. It’s quite far out of the city, but after I read that you get to make your own cup noodle for 300¥ (£1.70/$2.90), I just had to go there. You go through the whole process of decorating a cup, adding the dry noodles, soup powder & your choice of 4 dry ingredients (I did pork, onion, garlic & decorative ducks). Then the cup is all sealed up (you even get to operate the machine to seal and fill it) and you pop it into an inflatable bubble bag with a red cord to take home with you!

(via afrafemme)

amazonpoodle:

leupagus:

crossedwires:

zooey deschanel gets stuck in lucy liu’s dress

This is the least surprising photo I’ve ever seen.

Is it wrong that I love how Lucy Liu is like ~this is not my problem~ ~I am a cyborg princess and this is beneath me~

amazonpoodle:

leupagus:

crossedwires:

zooey deschanel gets stuck in lucy liu’s dress

This is the least surprising photo I’ve ever seen.

Is it wrong that I love how Lucy Liu is like ~this is not my problem~ ~I am a cyborg princess and this is beneath me~

(Source: viviandior, via faysbook)

hoodfuturism:

Mother Vivacious.

(Source: versaceslut, via ratchethime)

glittergeek:

tierracita:

mightyfemme:

tierracita:

tierracita:

tierracita:

Dear community of friends, family, and supporters.

We are three queer fatties of color and this will be our first time attending the Allied Media Conference. We really need your support getting there! 

The Allied Media Conference is in Detroit, Michigan June 19th-22nd. Our workshop was accepted and we are excited to present as part of theAbundant Bodies track! We have not been in any way able to afford this conference in the past and it’s prevented us from even applying but this year we took a leap of faith and submitted a workshop proposal. Now that we have been accepted we want to make sure this dream opportunity becomes a reality.

The cost for the three of us to attend is pretty immense, especially considering our limited and different economic resources. We anticipated being able to cover a portion of the cost but we will need your help to get all three of us there. We hope that our vibrant community of fatties, QTPOC, friends and family will help us make this trip possible. 

We need help covering the following costs:

Plane tickets $1800 (flights from Portland to Detroit are ~650 and flights from Salt Lake City are ~$550)
Housing $500 (we found an airbnb across the street from the university that would allow us to room together and cook meals to save money)
Transportation/taxis $100
Registration $150 (we were awarded an additional $150 from AMC to use towards registration but we would like to contribute more to the conference beyond that amount)

Trip Total 2550 + ~150 for indiegogo fees

Grand total 2700

Anything we raise here above and beyond this amount will go towards food and supplies for our workshop and our rewards offered here. 

If you can’t donate (and we totally understand that many folks won’t be able to), we hope that you will still support us by spreading the word or consider donating items/skills that we can add to our rewards offered.

We do this work to leave evidence of ourselves, those of us who are simultaneously unseen and hypervisible in our queer, fat, brown bodies. Please help us in doing this work!

Thank you! 

Cory, Jess, and Esther 

(read more about us and our workshop at the link!)

Check out our workshop description!

DANGER! Excessive Consumption of Selfies

What makes our fat self-representation consumable? We’ll look at the ways we make our own images and why we create these images, why they’re valuable, subversive and how they can reinforce the same oppressive systems we resist. We aim to build connection and community for fat folks IRL, online and build our media presence. We’ll identify the components of desirability that influences and control how our fat bodies are consumed and produce selfies documenting our exploration into fat self-imagery

You know you wanna help us get to the AMC! Please donate or reblog:)

We’ve almost hit $500! That’s nearly the price of one plane ticket! Please keep sharing and donating, if you can. 

Means the world to me to see all the support you’ve all offered already. Thank you!

community showing up, feels amazing! please help by continuing to signal boost and or donate!

We’re so so close to that first plane ticket—about $50 and we can buy it! If you haven’t already please reblog and spread the word, and if you’re considering donating, did you know we have rewards/perks if you do? From selfie postcards to personal serenades to jam to zines! 

Thank you so much to all you who have already reblogged and donated, especially to those of you from the fat activist community. It’s really powerful to see community support in action. 

BOOST! I love all of these beautiful amazing people and they are gonna BRING IT to the AMC!

ACCEPTED INTO GRADUATE SCHOOL OMFG

gnomees:

professionaltrans:

I’m going to be a doctor professor!

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Guys!  Come look at this!  And if you’re in the mood, could you add another fabulous happy dancing gif to the collection?  I can’t dance at all, and this is as close as I can to dancing for him!

sansasturk:

SIGNAL BOOST!!!!

This video might be the most clever way to raise money for dogs in need, because all you need to do is watch it.

"Just by watching these puppies, you’re raising money for dogs in need," says the narrator in the video above. "You see, if a video goes viral, YouTube shares the money they made from advertising with whoever made the video, and in this case, every dollar we earn will go toward feeding, treating and finding homes for dogs who haven’t been as lucky as us."

The video comes from The Pedigree Adoption Drive, and ends by imploring viewers to share because the more views received, the more money will be raised.

So share this video. You know, for the dogs.

(via roman-sunshine)

sourcedumal:

the-pelican-brief:

sourcedumal:

Racially based dating preferences are not made in a vacuum and I’m really tired of hearing that excuse

Because I have yet to hear an explanation about why someone doesn’t date a poc group that didn’t involve an extremely racist ass stereotype embedded in white supremacy and fetishism

Dating preferences are influenced by the white supremacist society we live in. When you are exposed to light, bright and white all your damn life, that shit is internalized.

LET ME TELL YOU SOMETHING REAL QUICK. I was raised around POC and white people all my life. I considered POC as my equals all my life. I was also raised around people with blue eyes all my life. I saw people with blue eyes as my equals.

But I’m attracted to people with green eyes. I have never been attracted to a man with blue eyes. I am attracted to fair skinned people. I acknowledge POC as attractive but I’ve never been attracted to them.

I was raised around women my whole life. Women are my equals. Yet, I’m not attracted to women (except maybe Beyoncé).

So don’t you dare tell me I am a white supremacist because I’m not attracted to POC. I’m just not sexually drawn to them. I didn’t internalize some white supremacist bull as a child I am just attracted to fair skinned men with green eyes.

IT IS NOT YOUR FREAKING PLACE TO TELL ME WHO I CAN AND CANNOT BE ATTRACTED TO AND ID APPRECIATE YOU KEEPING YOUR BULL CRAP OPINIONS TO YOURSELF.

*facepalm*

Because poc apparently aren’t light skinned with green eyes…..

But thanks for proving my point hon. Appreciate it.

Anyone who is going to try and pretend that they didn’t internalize white supremacy as children need to stop and think about it harder. We all did. Got it?

jeankd:

officialannakendrick:

sextronautt:

y’all react to the word sex the way dogs react to the word walk

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omg I’m crying at that dog gif.