Call for Photos

On March 25th I will be doing a presentation at Oakland University in Rochester Hills, Mi titled “Dissenting Bodies – Visibility, Fat Politics and Challenging Normal” during their Women’s History Month Series. Part of the presentation will center on people reclaiming their bodies by becoming visible. This will be very similar to what I wrote about in my post on selfies and how they can be used to challenge the gaze on your body by having control over how your body is visible.

image

Photo example, totally going to be in this presentation..

Since the theme of the series is to discuss feminist expression, I really want to tackle visibility by challenging feminist discourse on body image and reframe the discussion around people who don’t conform to beauty ideals. This will be done to show how focusing on what beauty ideals are and not the social consequences of what it means to live in a deviant or non-normative body has built body positive spaces around people with the most privilege, while also creating a movement that is often considered depoliticized or disconnected from systemic / institutional oppression.

A lot of the discussion will be about how fat bodies are viewed in society and imagery of fat people in the media but I want to start the discussion with how the bodies of marginalized people are viewed in society differently depending on the identities they possess. This is something that has been severely lacking from feminist politics and I want to give context to understand how constraints of visibility while they can differ between people all have a common thread, which is to restrict or limit difference.

If you want to be part of this presentation, send your photo to me via email (as an attachment) to fatbodypolitics_260b@sendtodropbox.com

I’m going to collect photos until March 10th and I should have more information about the talk soon.

**Just an fyi, the sendtodropbox email sends all of the email attachments and puts them into a dropbox folder. It’s super awesome and free.

After a over year of ongoing counseling I hate myself less each day.

redefiningbodyimage:

thankyouseeyouhi:

I love you Tumblr. I really do.

(Source: sunshinedaydreamerrrr, via redefiningbodyimage)

redefiningbodyimage:


I thought I would share a photo from my recent shoot. I am a USA size 16 and I am so proud of who I am. Being a modified plus-size model I have gotten a lot of love. I recently got an email from a girl stating that she saw me on a body positive blog and told me that I inspire her and that my photos have helped her to accept who she is and feel beautiful. I am so thankful for the love and support! I wish to show more people that you can be big, beautiful, modified, healthy, or who ever you identify with AND be loved! I just want each and everyone of you to know that you ARE beautiful. Don’t let anyone ever take that from you. 
You can find me and the rest of the photos from the photoshoot at Pinkandinked.tumblr.com!


Guh I want pink eyebrows

redefiningbodyimage:

I thought I would share a photo from my recent shoot. I am a USA size 16 and I am so proud of who I am. Being a modified plus-size model I have gotten a lot of love. I recently got an email from a girl stating that she saw me on a body positive blog and told me that I inspire her and that my photos have helped her to accept who she is and feel beautiful. I am so thankful for the love and support! I wish to show more people that you can be big, beautiful, modified, healthy, or who ever you identify with AND be loved! I just want each and everyone of you to know that you ARE beautiful. Don’t let anyone ever take that from you. 

You can find me and the rest of the photos from the photoshoot at Pinkandinked.tumblr.com!

Guh I want pink eyebrows

"No fat woman is happy with being fat! I’m certainly not. It’s just not possible. You’re young so you dont get it yet." - My Aunt

standalonespirit:

I need to stop being so stunned by people who utterly refuse to accept others are happy with their bodies, because they themselves fundamentally are not and may have never ever experienced that feeling.

It can be a stunning sound of hurt and confusion, that I myself am thrown off and second guess my ‘comfort level’. I think some of us (TeamTumblrBabeForce) have made that fundamental decision to turn our backs on that quiet violence of ‘hating’ our bodies, for a view of accepting that we wont feel ‘Beyonce’ everyday, but will sit back and know it alone in peace.

str8nochaser:

fitvillains:

“There’s Only One Thing To Do When The Internet Calls You Fat”

I laughed, cried, fist pumped and watched it twice.

The BEST thing you’ll see all day.

DOPENESS. 

(via redefiningbodyimage)

redefiningbodyimage:

adrowningwoman:

ellipsesprojectdaily:

Redefining Body Image: An Interview With Haley Querro

Last weekend I had the chance to sit down for a cup of tea and a (Facebook) chat with the babeliest…

View Post
shared via WordPress.com

Elise I love this interview so much. I’m just so proud to be part of Ellipses.

Yaaaaa! This was so much fun. Thank you Elise for the lovely exchange of words.

redefiningbodyimage:

adrowningwoman:

ellipsesprojectdaily:

Redefining Body Image: An Interview With Haley Querro

Last weekend I had the chance to sit down for a cup of tea and a (Facebook) chat with the babeliest…

View Post

shared via WordPress.com

Elise I love this interview so much. I’m just so proud to be part of Ellipses.

Yaaaaa! This was so much fun. Thank you Elise for the lovely exchange of words.

redefiningbodyimage:

As I’ve been receiving and answering questions, I’ve noticed one question being asked more and more above all others.

In short: “HOW do I deal with fat shaming?”

Part one of this video series covers my number one way to deal - Going on a “Media Diet”

I’ll be continuing this series at a random pace that will be dictated by my life, schedule, habits, and ever-changing states of mind. Nevertheless, the planned topic for subsequent vlogs will focus on how to deal with fat shaming in public and online spaces.

redefiningbodyimage:

feminismisprettycool:

**heads up, disordered relationships with bodies and food below**

Since I moved back home from graduate school, I’ve gained about 20 pounds. This is from a combination of living first with my parents and now with supporters and not being in control of what food is in the kitchen, having enough…

You are okay. You are allowed to feel the way you’re feeling. It is something that happens, that seems like an inconvenient bump along the way, but it’s not your fault. You are not the problem. You will get past it and I wish you all the smiles and love in the world.

I go through the same thing and still do sometimes, so I know my reassurance may not be helpful or seem futile, I don’t know - But I think you’re lovely.

This^ It is so important to remember that we all go through a range of emotions with our bodies and no one state is inherently better than another. It’s ok to have bad days, months, years. It’s ok to struggle. This is also aside from that fact that a change in your body regardless of how it changes can be traumatic and it’s hard turn off the thought processes that we have been wired to remember.

theselfmademen:

The way in which people interact with me because I’m disabled (I use a wheelchair most of the time) and the way in which people interact with me when they know I’m trans are quite similar. People think that this gives them some sort of a right to my body, a right to information about it, they’ll ask personal or invasive questions and not realise why those might not be appropriate. “Do you have a dick yet?” and “so what’s wrong? Why are you in a wheelchair?” don’t feel that different as questions, both uncomfortably invasive, and yet other disabled people ask me those sorts of questions about my transition, when I’m out, and other trans people ask me those sorts of questions about my disability when they know about it. I’ve had to work hard to reclaim the right to privacy about my body. Asking someone whether you can help them (and taking no for an answer), or asking someone their preferred pronouns, are far more appropriate than personal questions about somebody else’s body.
Full Article

theselfmademen:

The way in which people interact with me because I’m disabled (I use a wheelchair most of the time) and the way in which people interact with me when they know I’m trans are quite similar. People think that this gives them some sort of a right to my body, a right to information about it, they’ll ask personal or invasive questions and not realise why those might not be appropriate. “Do you have a dick yet?” and “so what’s wrong? Why are you in a wheelchair?” don’t feel that different as questions, both uncomfortably invasive, and yet other disabled people ask me those sorts of questions about my transition, when I’m out, and other trans people ask me those sorts of questions about my disability when they know about it. I’ve had to work hard to reclaim the right to privacy about my body. Asking someone whether you can help them (and taking no for an answer), or asking someone their preferred pronouns, are far more appropriate than personal questions about somebody else’s body.


Full Article

(via redefiningbodyimage)

theloveyourselfchallenge:

Today is my birthday and this year my goal is to undo the lies that I believe. My body is changing and I am not going to let the lies and ideas of this world steal away the love and respect that my body deserves. I am free to take up space in this world and my worth and value is not based on my appearance. So here is to another year of opportunity to fight the good fight and to continue embracing who I am today and who I am becoming <3 

theloveyourselfchallenge:

Today is my birthday and this year my goal is to undo the lies that I believe. My body is changing and I am not going to let the lies and ideas of this world steal away the love and respect that my body deserves. I am free to take up space in this world and my worth and value is not based on my appearance. So here is to another year of opportunity to fight the good fight and to continue embracing who I am today and who I am becoming <3 

(via theloveyourselfchallenge)

fuckyeahbodyimage:

That’s So Raven

(Source: kezzoh, via stophatingyourbody)

internalized racism…and stuff

porcelainshewolf:

(I’m trying to clarify what I was posting about last night, but I’m not sure if I succeed in being anymore clear)

Here’s the thing.

I’m not against personal responsibility. We should hold ourselves accountable when we can. We are all products of the society we live in and society is made up of us.   

But here’s the other thing.

Some people have more power in society than others.

To tell me to love my body all the time no matter what is an unrealistic expectation.

Look at the word I live in. How could I not suffer from internalized racism? And do keep in mind, I am a light skinned poc and I benefit from a lot of privilege in that area and I have still spent most of my life feeling like my skin is too dark.  I am surrounded by whiteness. Whiteness is the ideal and I have known that since before I could construct sentences.

And I know that the ideal is some white supremacy bullshit. I know that on a logical level. But its still beaten into my head everyday. I still see that ideal everywhere I look. Its pretty much impossible not to internalize it so some degree.

I know I’m beautiful. I know my hair is beautiful. But when I have my bad moments, or days, that is the first thing I forget.

So for people, and I mean white people, to say love your body no matter is not really helpful. And white people acting like the have the monopoly on how body positivity is not helpful.  

(Source: natxromanoff)