Anonymous asked: How do you decide when to stop trying to educate someone? I get so frustrated trying to make people understand, and I have a hard time knowing when to give up and let them keep being wrong.

You need to figure it out for yourself. I stop responding when I don’t feel like I’m having a constructive conversation anymore. If someone is continually ignoring what I’m saying or is saying really gross shit I have better things to do than give them my time. No one is required to educate another person and it is super important that we put ourselves first. Don’t put your own wellbeing on the line just because you feel someone needs to be educated about something. Google exists and you are more important than their ignorance.

Read This Week

gradientlair:

This is my 19th Read This Week feature! I read some excellent articles recently! Check these out:

The Glorification of White Crime by iambutchsolo on Tumblr is an EXQUISITE essay and analysis of how white privilege allows white criminals in media (whether drama or true life) to be portrayed as nuanced, complex individuals, not shells of pure evil. This essay GOES IN. And, as someone who is a fan of Dexter (one of the shows mentioned), but also watches television with a CRITICAL EYE, I 100% agree with what is presented in this essay.

An Open Letter To Abigal Fisher by Evette Donne on Clutch is excellent. Perfect. In case the name Abigail Fisher doesn’t ring a bell to you (which I doubt by now, but just in case), check out her case Fisher vs. The University of Texas.

The Impossibility of Race-Blind Admissions by Inimai M. Chettiar and Roopal Patel on The Atlantic is a good read. This article also deals with the Abigal Fisher case.  They write: “On the surface, Fisher vs. UT asks a simple question: Is it constitutional for a university to consider race when evaluating an applicant’s personal background? But underneath this question is a deeper one: Can a student’s racial background race really be separated from who he or she is as an applicant and a human being?”

Saving The Boobies Will Not Save Me by Jazmine Walker on RH Reality Check is GREAT. She discusses how the sexualization of the “pink” campaign is not meeting the needs or addressing the severity of breast cancer for Black women. She writes: “Talking about breasts as if they are an independent entity, as if it’s the breasts that are worth saving as opposed to the life and body they are attached to is not only patriarchal, but also down right sexist.” All I have to say to this article is YASSSSSSSS. She went IN! Brilliant, nuanced piece.

The Politics of Curviness and White Womanhood by Robert Reece is a great read. He writes: “Before attaching some type of privilege to the title ‘diva’ and the characterization ‘curvy,’ recognize your white privilege and consider pointing a finger at the patriarchal faces of men who institutionalize these beauty standards by only casting certain types of women for roles under the guise that audiences only want to see thin, fair skinned women with long, flowing hair.” READ THIS.

Stay tuned for next week’s suggestions!

girljanitor:

Ohio And Florida Public Schools Lock Mentally Disabled Children In Closets
To discipline misbehaving students, public schools in Ohio and Florida regularly send children to “seclusion” — isolation in a locked cell-like room, old office, or closet, NPR’s State Impact reports. Many of these children are special needs students and their parents are not always told of this disciplinary practice.
Ohio schools — where seclusion is almost completely unregulated — sent students to seclusion rooms 4,236 times in the 2009-2010 school year. Sixty percent of these students had disabilities.
Florida schools secluded students 4,637 times in 2010-2011 and 4,193 in 2011-2012. 42 percent of seclusions were for pre-K through 3rd graders. In the 2011-2012 school year, 300 seclusions lasted more than an hour. The state has just three stipulations for using seclusion rooms: teachers may not choke or suffocate students, the room must be approved by a fire marshal, and the lights must be left on.

A joint report by StateImpact and Columbus Dispatch report found rampant abuse and lack of training of the punishment, which is meant as a last resort to deal with violent children:

But last school year, one Pickerington special-education teacher sent children to a seclusion room more than 60 times, district records show. In nearly all of those incidents, the children were not violent. Often, they were sent to the seclusion room for being “mouthy,” or whining about their school work.
Pickerington Special Education Director Bob Blackburn said the teacher in that classroom was new and that someone in the district has now taught her the right way to use the seclusion room.
Other Pickerington teachers misused the rooms, too, though. In another classroom, children were secluded more than 30 times last school year. Two-thirds of those instances involved misbehavior and not violence, district records show.

Far from benefiting violent or rowdy students, seclusion has been found to be deeply traumatizing, sometimes leading children to hurt or kill themselves. In one special education school in Georgia, a 13-year-old boy hung himself in a seclusion room in November 2004.

“Unfortunately there have been some cases throughout Florida where mostly children with disabilities, autistic kids in particular, have been restrained,” Rep. Ari Porth told StateImpact Florida’s Sarah Gonzalez earlier this year. “I’ve heard on some occasions (students) put in storage closets because the administrator or teacher just doesn’t know how to appropriately handle them.”
Hialeah state Rep. Eddy Gonzalez, a Democrat, introduced a bill this year that would have prohibited schools from secluding students. The bill also limited schools to physically restraining students with disability only when there is “imminent risk of serious injury or death to student or others.”
Only school officials trained to restrain students would be allowed to do so, according to the bill.
The bill died in subcommittee in March.
There are no rules regulating restraint and seclusion in Ohio.

girljanitor:

Ohio And Florida Public Schools Lock Mentally Disabled Children In Closets

To discipline misbehaving students, public schools in Ohio and Florida regularly send children to “seclusion” — isolation in a locked cell-like room, old office, or closet, NPR’s State Impact reports. Many of these children are special needs students and their parents are not always told of this disciplinary practice.

Ohio schools — where seclusion is almost completely unregulated — sent students to seclusion rooms 4,236 times in the 2009-2010 school year. Sixty percent of these students had disabilities.

Florida schools secluded students 4,637 times in 2010-2011 and 4,193 in 2011-2012. 42 percent of seclusions were for pre-K through 3rd graders. In the 2011-2012 school year, 300 seclusions lasted more than an hour. The state has just three stipulations for using seclusion rooms: teachers may not choke or suffocate students, the room must be approved by a fire marshal, and the lights must be left on.

Brady Spencer sits with her son Brendon. Brendon has Aspergers, ADHD, and mood disorders. A few years ago she decided to take him out of his Mantua, Ohio public school, where he would often be sent to the hallway or a spare office during class. He now goes to a charter school for special needs kids.

A joint report by StateImpact and Columbus Dispatch report found rampant abuse and lack of training of the punishment, which is meant as a last resort to deal with violent children:

But last school year, one Pickerington special-education teacher sent children to a seclusion room more than 60 times, district records show. In nearly all of those incidents, the children were not violent. Often, they were sent to the seclusion room for being “mouthy,” or whining about their school work.

Pickerington Special Education Director Bob Blackburn said the teacher in that classroom was new and that someone in the district has now taught her the right way to use the seclusion room.

Other Pickerington teachers misused the rooms, too, though. In another classroom, children were secluded more than 30 times last school year. Two-thirds of those instances involved misbehavior and not violence, district records show.

Far from benefiting violent or rowdy students, seclusion has been found to be deeply traumatizing, sometimes leading children to hurt or kill themselves. In one special education school in Georgia, a 13-year-old boy hung himself in a seclusion room in November 2004.

“Unfortunately there have been some cases throughout Florida where mostly children with disabilities, autistic kids in particular, have been restrained,” Rep. Ari Porth told StateImpact Florida’s Sarah Gonzalez earlier this year. “I’ve heard on some occasions (students) put in storage closets because the administrator or teacher just doesn’t know how to appropriately handle them.

Hialeah state Rep. Eddy Gonzalez, a Democrat, introduced a bill this year that would have prohibited schools from secluding students. The bill also limited schools to physically restraining students with disability only when there is “imminent risk of serious injury or death to student or others.”

Only school officials trained to restrain students would be allowed to do so, according to the bill.

The bill died in subcommittee in March.

There are no rules regulating restraint and seclusion in Ohio.

(via quelola)

pussy-envy:

so i got called a “feminazi” today for the first time.
Its amazing how a patriarchy has hacked “feminist” and “nazi” together to attempt to smear those who are fighting against everything that nazi’s stood for and what society perpetuates in its own sneaky ways. 

pussy-envy:

so i got called a “feminazi” today for the first time.

Its amazing how a patriarchy has hacked “feminist” and “nazi” together to attempt to smear those who are fighting against everything that nazi’s stood for and what society perpetuates in its own sneaky ways. 

(via thenewwomensmovement)

karnythia:

ACLU Sues School that Outed Native Teen’s Pregnancy

milkeemountainmama:

countrygramma:

There just aren’t even words for how messed up all of this is. At the very least Shantelle should’ve had the right to share or not share this information with her classmates on her own time and in a way she feels comfortable with. Big ups to Shantelle and what sounds like a very supportive mother bringing in the ACLU and letting people know this isn’t okay. 

The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of New Mexico filed a lawsuit last week behalf of Shantelle Hicks, 15, who was initially kicked out of middle school and then publicly humiliated at an assembly by the school director because she was pregnant.

“It was so embarrassing to have all the other kids staring at me as I walked into the gymnasium,” Hicks said in a statement released by the ACLU. “I didn’t want the whole school to know I was pregnant because it’s not their business, and it wasn’t right for my teachers to single me out.”

Hicks attends Wingate Elementary School, a Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school, and is currently in the eighth grade. She discovered she was pregnant approximately three weeks before the assembly, and she and her mother told the director of the middle school and two other staff members. They initially responded by kicking her out of school. The ACLU of New Mexico sent a demand letter to the school, informing them that it is illegal to deny a student access to education because of pregnancy status. Wingate readmitted Hicks after four missed days of instruction.

Approximately two weeks later the director of the middle school and another staff member had Hicks stand before the entire middle school at an assembly and announced that she was pregnant. Until that point, no one other than Hicks’ sister knew that she was pregnant.

“Too often, pregnant students face significant barriers or outright discrimination in school,” said Galen Sherwin, staff attorney with the ACLU Women’s Rights Project. “Instead, schools should give pregnant and parenting students the support they need to help them succeed, for both themselves and for their children.”

and PLEASE don’t lose site of the fact that this is a *boarding school*. which means that while this sort of thing probably does happen at public schools—there is a *historical relationship* with pregnant native students and native sexuality and boarding school violence and *genocide* that absolutely can NOT be overlooked here…in other words, this isn’t “slut shaming”—except in how slut shaming is connected to *genocide*.

(via racialicious)

"My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and more intelligent than college professors."

— Maya Angelou (via marxisforbros)

(Source: xzavierzulu, via marxisforbros-deactivated201211)