#mybeautifulbody

This article was published in a local magazine this month and it took me a minute to realize that the photo had been photoshopped to hide the fact that I’m wearing a crop top. While I was at the shoot the photographer kept asking me to pull the shirt down because they thought the 1 inch of skin showing would distract people from my face.

I spoke about the exchange while I was at AMC a few weekends ago and people are now tweeting their own photos on the #mybeautifulbody. Fat crop tops are not necessary but I think it’s important to note how the prevalence of fat phobia made the writer of the article, who I think was fantastic, not even notice or think about checking to make sure the photo wasn’t photoshopped. 

Bottom photo was taken the same day. Clearly my stomach is going to ruin the world.

Amazing FAT stuff going on this weekend at Allied Media Conference.
Here is where I will be on Friday and Saturday!
First I’m talking about performing survival while fat for a Movement Movement track workshop. "Detroit Dance: From the Street to the Stage"

Can an individual moving body represent or embody society? How does human performance on the street and on the stage shape us? In this session we will view work of Detroit-based dance artists; discuss bodies and politics through conversations and experience embodied movement workshops designed to empower and excite all movers, inclusive of all bodies, and experience levels. (Presenters: Maya Stovall, Piper Carter, K. Natasha Foreman, Kristi Faulkner, Seycon Nadia Chea, Chris Braz, Amanda Levitt , Quaint, Efe Bes plus Collaborating Dancers)

I’m on a panel about how to center fat activism and uplift the voices of marginalized people in the community. "Race, Fat Activism & Media" 

How can fat activists centre the voices of the most marginalized in their organizing? How can we make the movement (and the media) more accessible to folks with different, multiple identities? This panel will bring together long-time fat activists to discuss their own personal experiences with organizing, unpack the historical whiteness of Fat activism in North America, explore alternative media that challenges more than just body fascism, and discuss critical strategies for making Fat activism more inclusive for everyone.

Finally, I’m co-facilitating a caucus titled "Building Inclusive Fat Communities Online"

How can we build fat-positive communities online that actively resist social hierarchies of race, class, gender, and ability? What do fat-positive communities gain when we value all of the intersecting identities of fat people? This caucus is for anyone who wants to build stronger, more inclusive fat positive online communities that are committed to challenging all forms of social hierarchy.

I wish everyone could come! It’s going to be an amazing weekend. ❤

Amazing FAT stuff going on this weekend at Allied Media Conference.

Here is where I will be on Friday and Saturday!

First I’m talking about performing survival while fat for a Movement Movement track workshop. "Detroit Dance: From the Street to the Stage"

Can an individual moving body represent or embody society? How does human performance on the street and on the stage shape us? In this session we will view work of Detroit-based dance artists; discuss bodies and politics through conversations and experience embodied movement workshops designed to empower and excite all movers, inclusive of all bodies, and experience levels. (Presenters: Maya Stovall, Piper Carter, K. Natasha Foreman, Kristi Faulkner, Seycon Nadia Chea, Chris Braz, Amanda Levitt , Quaint, Efe Bes plus Collaborating Dancers)

I’m on a panel about how to center fat activism and uplift the voices of marginalized people in the community. "Race, Fat Activism & Media" 

How can fat activists centre the voices of the most marginalized in their organizing? How can we make the movement (and the media) more accessible to folks with different, multiple identities? This panel will bring together long-time fat activists to discuss their own personal experiences with organizing, unpack the historical whiteness of Fat activism in North America, explore alternative media that challenges more than just body fascism, and discuss critical strategies for making Fat activism more inclusive for everyone.

Finally, I’m co-facilitating a caucus titled "Building Inclusive Fat Communities Online"

How can we build fat-positive communities online that actively resist social hierarchies of race, class, gender, and ability? What do fat-positive communities gain when we value all of the intersecting identities of fat people? This caucus is for anyone who wants to build stronger, more inclusive fat positive online communities that are committed to challenging all forms of social hierarchy.

I wish everyone could come! It’s going to be an amazing weekend. 

Fat-acceptance filmmakers got violent threats for daring to create a Kickstarter.

It’s easy to roll your eyes at trolling—to say “don’t read the comments” and dismiss trolls as just a bunch of haters. But let’s talk about trolling for what it really is: disruptive behavior that seeks reinforce power over marginalized communities.  The power issues that motivate trolling become especially obvious when you talk to fat-acceptance activists about their work online. 

In April, Lindsey Averill and Veridiana Lieberman launched a Kickstarter campaign for their documentaryFattitude, a feature-length film that will seek to “expose how popular culture fosters fat prejudice” and offer an alternative approach to thinking about fatness. When the campaign began, Averill and Veridiana were instantly attacked online. People wrote vitriolic messages to them on Twitter and on the project’s social media sites, saying that the film shouldn’t exist. The online abuse spread into their home lives—people called Averill to harass her, so she changed her number. Then someone anonymously ordered her a pizza. In an interview with a local TV station, Averill says she knows that this isn’t just about trying to make a fat woman feel bad by sending her a pizza. “They are telling me they know where I live,” she says.

Please read my first article at Bitch. I’m so excited about it.

Hey look! It’s my face.
Support the Abundant Bodies track at the Allied Media Conference next month by donating to their indiegogo campaign.
So much of the discourse is centered on queer, trans and people of color’s experience within our community and as fat identified people. That makes the track itself really special and amazing.
You can see all the workshops at the link here.
Don’t forget to share and donate!

Hey look! It’s my face.

Support the Abundant Bodies track at the Allied Media Conference next month by donating to their indiegogo campaign.

So much of the discourse is centered on queer, trans and people of color’s experience within our community and as fat identified people. That makes the track itself really special and amazing.

You can see all the workshops at the link here.

Don’t forget to share and donate!

Have you donated to the Abundant Bodies track at AMC? I’m lucky enough to live in Detroit where the conference is held but there are amazing fat activists from all over the world coming together to talk about fat politics next month.

So many people need your support! PLEASE donate / share this fundraiser. 

Last day to vote for me! Less than 80 votes from #5!  Please take a moment to vote for me!

My friend Casey is an amazing fat studies scholar, she’s the co-chair of the National Women’s Studies Association Fat Studies caucus, and just an all around amazing person.

Please donate / share this fundraiser so she can continue to do all of her amazing work while making it more accessible to her.

"

The body acceptance movement wants people to love themselves.

The fat acceptance movement wants others to love them.

"

Difference between body and fat acceptance (via nothealthyateverysize)

Good try but no. Fat politics rejects the gaze that is put on our bodies and the demand we conform to a social structure that privileges / idealizes thinness. Fat acceptance has nothing to do with other people accepting us but us accepting ourselves, though I would argue that i’m not really interested in demanding anyone to have a specific feeling about their own body. 

Posts like this one are why I don’t use the term acceptance because people who are invested in fat hatred and idealizing thinness are too easily able to divert the true meaning behind “fat acceptance” to trivialize the movement. This is why I use the phrase fat politics. Not only because fat is inherently political but because as I stated above I’m not interested in working within a system that seeks to harm me or other fat people.

Fat politics is about the systemic and institutional discrimination fat people experience. Period. I don’t give a fuck if people love me or other fat people. I care that fat people have access to the same opportunities as thin people whether they are economic, social or institutional. 

This is also why I am super critical of body acceptance in general. Too many people who are involved within body acceptance are fat hating. If you are promoting “acceptance” that means all people have the right to accept themselves, not the few people who you believe are allowed to.

I made a post with a few different projects that are happening right now in fat community and need financial support!

Take the time to donate and / or share!

Keep believing your lies.

People keep sending me messages about how the lack of acceptance of fat politics is because we don’t matter. That the work I do doesn’t help anyone and the words I write do nothing.

Yet, I’m getting anonymous messages from someone who is so scared of the things I say and the words I write that they have to send me hateful messages.

Lies.

Have you voted for me yet?

Because you should. Netroots Nation is holding a scholarship contest to pay for registration for the conference in Detroit this summer. Being able to go to conferences and network with other activists is incredibly important to talking about fat politics outside of fat community. Sadly, since my work isn’t paid and I do all of this on a volunteer basis I’m unable to afford the $350 registration fee.

You can help get me there by voting for me. <-Click the link and vote.

If you are outside of the US use the zipcode 48202 or google to find another one!

If you won’t do it for me do it for my mom’s puppy Snickers.

Last night I got an email from a friend asking for my advice on how to respond to an acquaintance who viewed fat positive blogs on tumblr. After looking at a few blogs on tumblr they came away with the idea that fat stigma is an issue that only impacts white cisgender middle class women while also being horrified that we clearly disregard our own health. The first point, while being completely untrue, has far more to do with the hierarchy that has been created in fat spaces where fat people with the most privilege due to gender, class, race and even body size are given the most space.

Read the rest at the link! And don’t forget to tweet with the tag #notyourgoodfatty

#notyourgoodfatty

Fatties of tumblr. Come on twitter and tweet under the hashtag  about all of the things you WON’T be doing to make other people more comfortable with your body.

I was interviewed by Fat Girl Food Squad! Check it out! Their website makes me hungry. *drooools

I wrote a chapter for this book almost 2 years ago and they are finally at the point where they are trying to get it published. It will be an awesome fat positive art book.

Support / share.