Happening now. Presenting my research at The Society for the Study for Social Problems in San Francisco.

Happening now. Presenting my research at The Society for the Study for Social Problems in San Francisco.

 #mybeautifulbody

This article was published in a local magazine this month and it took me a minute to realize that the photo had been photoshopped to hide the fact that I’m wearing a crop top. While I was at the shoot the photographer kept asking me to pull the shirt down because they thought the 1 inch of skin showing would distract people from my face.

I spoke about the exchange while I was at AMC a few weekends ago and people are now tweeting their own photos on the #mybeautifulbody. Fat crop tops are not necessary but I think it’s important to note how the prevalence of fat phobia made the writer of the article, who I think was fantastic, not even notice or think about checking to make sure the photo wasn’t photoshopped. 

Bottom photo was taken the same day. Clearly my stomach is going to ruin the world.

Fat-acceptance filmmakers got violent threats for daring to create a Kickstarter.

It’s easy to roll your eyes at trolling—to say “don’t read the comments” and dismiss trolls as just a bunch of haters. But let’s talk about trolling for what it really is: disruptive behavior that seeks reinforce power over marginalized communities.  The power issues that motivate trolling become especially obvious when you talk to fat-acceptance activists about their work online. 

In April, Lindsey Averill and Veridiana Lieberman launched a Kickstarter campaign for their documentaryFattitude, a feature-length film that will seek to “expose how popular culture fosters fat prejudice” and offer an alternative approach to thinking about fatness. When the campaign began, Averill and Veridiana were instantly attacked online. People wrote vitriolic messages to them on Twitter and on the project’s social media sites, saying that the film shouldn’t exist. The online abuse spread into their home lives—people called Averill to harass her, so she changed her number. Then someone anonymously ordered her a pizza. In an interview with a local TV station, Averill says she knows that this isn’t just about trying to make a fat woman feel bad by sending her a pizza. “They are telling me they know where I live,” she says.

Please read my first article at Bitch. I’m so excited about it.

Hey look! It’s my face.
Support the Abundant Bodies track at the Allied Media Conference next month by donating to their indiegogo campaign.
So much of the discourse is centered on queer, trans and people of color’s experience within our community and as fat identified people. That makes the track itself really special and amazing.
You can see all the workshops at the link here.
Don’t forget to share and donate!

Hey look! It’s my face.

Support the Abundant Bodies track at the Allied Media Conference next month by donating to their indiegogo campaign.

So much of the discourse is centered on queer, trans and people of color’s experience within our community and as fat identified people. That makes the track itself really special and amazing.

You can see all the workshops at the link here.

Don’t forget to share and donate!

Last day to vote for me! Less than 80 votes from #5!  Please take a moment to vote for me!

Support Abundant Bodies at AMC2014
The Abundant Bodies track at the AMC this summer needs your help to support the work of fat activists with their workshops and activist organizing.
I’m part of two different sessions but there are so many amazing workshops and other activists who are coming to Detroit to talk about fat politics over the weekend. They all need financial support to not only get to the conference but also for lodging and other expenses over the weekend. 
via the funding campaign,
Some of the most well-known fat activists (including Dr. Charlotte Cooper, Amanda Levitt, Virgie Tovar) will be sharing their brilliance alongside up and coming young qtpoc fatties. Some of the topics and issues folks are exploring include race & fat activism, the “dangers” of excessive selfie consumptions, exploring fat & kink, building an inclusive fat community, body autonomy vs. body positivity, reimagining desirability, fat activism for unruly people, and so much more! 
From the program guide:

ln this track we will gather, share and celebrate the wisdom and abundance of our bodies. Abundant/thick/fat bodies are the target of so much hate, policing and negativity, even in our organizing communities. How do we unlearn mainstream ideas of what a body should look like and (re)-learn to celebrate the diversity, resilience, wisdom and beauty of all bodies? This track will explore these questions and create spaces to challenge the ongoing ways mainstream media shames and harms abundant bodies, to name fatphobia in our organizing and activism, and to create media and practical strategies for resistance, healing and community building. We will broaden the conversation around fat activism by centering this track on the voices of Indigenous, Black, people of color, dis/abled, super-sized, trans and queer fat folks. Through workshops, panels and skillshares we will transform mainstream ideas around abundant bodies and create resilient communities, media and art centred around abundant bodies!

Please support and share this campaign! There are a ton of awesome perks for donating too!

Support Abundant Bodies at AMC2014

The Abundant Bodies track at the AMC this summer needs your help to support the work of fat activists with their workshops and activist organizing.

I’m part of two different sessions but there are so many amazing workshops and other activists who are coming to Detroit to talk about fat politics over the weekend. They all need financial support to not only get to the conference but also for lodging and other expenses over the weekend. 

via the funding campaign,

Some of the most well-known fat activists (including Dr. Charlotte CooperAmanda LevittVirgie Tovar) will be sharing their brilliance alongside up and coming young qtpoc fatties. Some of the topics and issues folks are exploring include race & fat activism, the “dangers” of excessive selfie consumptions, exploring fat & kink, building an inclusive fat community, body autonomy vs. body positivity, reimagining desirability, fat activism for unruly people, and so much more! 

From the program guide:

ln this track we will gather, share and celebrate the wisdom and abundance of our bodies. Abundant/thick/fat bodies are the target of so much hate, policing and negativity, even in our organizing communities. How do we unlearn mainstream ideas of what a body should look like and (re)-learn to celebrate the diversity, resilience, wisdom and beauty of all bodies? This track will explore these questions and create spaces to challenge the ongoing ways mainstream media shames and harms abundant bodies, to name fatphobia in our organizing and activism, and to create media and practical strategies for resistance, healing and community building. We will broaden the conversation around fat activism by centering this track on the voices of Indigenous, Black, people of color, dis/abled, super-sized, trans and queer fat folks. Through workshops, panels and skillshares we will transform mainstream ideas around abundant bodies and create resilient communities, media and art centred around abundant bodies!

Please support and share this campaign! There are a ton of awesome perks for donating too!

Happy International No Diet Day everyone. May you all spend the day not giving a fuck.

#notyourgoodfatty

Fatties of tumblr. Come on twitter and tweet under the hashtag  about all of the things you WON’T be doing to make other people more comfortable with your body.

I was interviewed by Fat Girl Food Squad! Check it out! Their website makes me hungry. *drooools

I was interviewed by Anahvia Taiyib for her blog Taiyib Manifested! Make sure to check it out in the future. She is going to be interviewing some really amazing activists whose names you should already know like Suey Park, Mikki Kendall, and Sophia Banks. An interview with Jamie Broadnax who started Black Girl Nerds is already up.

Anonymous said: As a person who's made it my goal to make myself healthy, I feel like I should share this. I'm all for fat activism, but I think there needs to be a PSA about health. Being over weight is perfectly fine, but being HEALTHY is the most important. Trying to get on the right track in health will change your life. As someone who's been overweight I can vouch for the change it makes in your life & I think it's important to share this. It's changed my mood and I'm a happier person. Health is key. Peace

No it’s really not. What you want to do in your life is fine but shaming people for not performing health or living in their body the way you think they should is crap. If you were actually interested in health you would be focusing on creating a society where health behaviors are accessible to all people. That happens by removing social and economic barriers to those behaviors by ending discrimination / stigma marginalized people experience. Not just fat people but all marginalized people are impacted physically and mentally by discrimination / stigma.

People that only want to focus on individuals transcending the constraints on their life to “be healthy” is not only damaging but completely ignorant of the reality that people live in. Assuming that fat people need to focus on being healthy when discussing fat politics also ignores the harm discrimination and stigma does to fat people, with true access to health behaviors becoming a reality when we are no longer marginalized. Not facing discrimination, economic hardship etc will drastically change the ability of people to engage with health behaviors.

A more productive society is a more equal society.

When I talk about health behaviors I not only mean having access to fresh foods and places to move your body but also access to stigma free medicine, including treatment and testing. You can have access to all three of those things and still face significant barriers if you don’t have the time or ability use them. Constraints such as physical ability, stress level, family dynamics, class status etc also changes someone’s ability to engage in those behaviors. Even someone who doesn’t have those constraints on their own life should not have their humanity given to them on the conditional basis that they perform health to make other people comfortable.

I was on Michigan Radio’s show Stateside talking about Melissa McCarthy’s Elle cover as well as the state of fat activism in Michigan. From the interview,

Four covers were shot with four different stars: Reese Witherspoon, Shailene Woodley, Penelope Cruz and Melissa McCarthy.

Witherspoon wore a fitted black dress, Woodley wore a swimsuit and Cruz recently gave birth to her second baby, so hers was a close-up face shot. Curvy, full-figured McCarthy was swathed and bundled up in a big coat.

That led to criticism that McCarthy was covered up because she’s full-figured — though it should be noted that Melissa McCarthy herself said she was glad to be a part of the cover.

But it does raise the issue of society’s attitudes toward overweight or obese people.

I’m pretty happy with the interview but I do wish I had more time to talk in depth about other fat women in the media who are also taking up space in the way Melissa does. Specifically women like Queen Latifah, Amber Riley and Gabourey Sidibe, among others.

You can listen to the full interview at the link above.

Special K has had a long history of stealing from body positive activists, especially in the last two years when they stole Marilyn Wann’s Yay! Scales™ for their More than a Number campaign.

They have now done it to me. I started making body positive measuring tapes back in the beginning of 2011 when I was running Love Your Body Detroit. They just came out with a new advertising using the same thing, but this time to sell their crappy weight loss corn flakes. 

Below you can see my handmade body positive measuring tape that I made to go into fat rights tool kits that were to raise money for LYBD. 

(Don’t remove this text)

"There is no getting outside of the entanglement of relations of power and subjectification. Given this, it is necessary for those engaged in fat politics to look critically at the practices that we take up as a challenge to fat-phobia. These very practices become, in their own way, constitutive elements not only of the self but of our movement. Following Clare (2002) and The Queer Commons, I suggest that a resistance to and disruption of the normal – ‘that center against which every one of us is judged and compared’ (Clare 2002: para. 23) – makes space for a more fully embodied means of opposition, a more critical form of identification and a more inclusive mode of organizing."

Disrupting normal: Toward the ‘ordinary and familiar’ in fat politicsZoe ̈ Meleo-Erwin 

fatbodypolitics:

I will be on KPFA 94.1 talking about fat experience and how fatness intersects with disability tomorrow afternoon, 4/5, at 2:30 pm pacific time or 5:30 pm eastern. If you are not on the West Coast you can listen live online. http://www.kpfa.org/pushing-limits
If anything you can listen to me try to give coherent responses to a lot of different questions.

In case you missed it you can listen to the full interview at this link.
I had a really good time and I was able to get a lot of information out in a very short time. YAY for speed talking.

fatbodypolitics:

I will be on KPFA 94.1 talking about fat experience and how fatness intersects with disability tomorrow afternoon, 4/5, at 2:30 pm pacific time or 5:30 pm eastern. If you are not on the West Coast you can listen live online. http://www.kpfa.org/pushing-limits

If anything you can listen to me try to give coherent responses to a lot of different questions.

In case you missed it you can listen to the full interview at this link.

I had a really good time and I was able to get a lot of information out in a very short time. YAY for speed talking.

(via friendofmarilyn)