makeupftw:

My lichtenstein makeup
http://mulatto-dream.tumblr.com
redefiningbodyimage:

serious brilliance, right here.

redefiningbodyimage:

serious brilliance, right here.

(Source: iridessence)

kiss-my-aspergers:

doiecism:

flawlesstrueperfection:

apostrophized:

gnomees:

I was recently asked if there are any other makeup brands I don’t work with, since I’m as unenthusiastic about MAC as I am.  My answer?  Only one.

I won’t use anything by Smashbox.  I’ve heard their products are amazing, and I’d love to work with the photo finish product set, but I won’t do it.

Several years ago, I walked into Sephora.  I had a date that night, a Very Important Date, and I’d scheduled a makeover.  Someone screwed up their schedules, and the only person who could do the appointment was the visiting Smashbox artist.

I have rarely in my life been so insulted.  He scanned me up and down, curled his lip, and told me he didn’t work with fat people.  That Smashbox didn’t need my fat money.  That he’d like to personally have me escorted from the store, because my fat body offended his sight.

Seriously.

I’ve worked in fashion as a model, fitting model, and design assistant for most of my life.  My mom is a designer, and that’s where it all got started.  Over time, I’ve been privileged to work with other designers over the years, and only one of them worked with fat people explicitly.  Still, with all the horror stories of Karl Lagerfeld and other remarkably shitty pros in the field, I was never so slapped across the face as that day.

I marched, furious, humiliated, and on the edge of tears, straight back to my car, where I broke down before cancelling my date.  It took me a couple of days to summon the courage, and then called Sephora to lodge a complaint.  Sephora was amazing, and instantly won my loyalty.  I won’t go into details, but they did their best to make things right, including putting me in touch with the regional vice president.  

Smashbox did not do so well.  The same day I dealt with Sephora, I called Smashbox.  And they literally laughed at me over the phone.  They told me that the artist was more important to them than a client was, and that they weren’t going to have anything more to do with it.  And then they hung up.

They hung up on a legitimate, honest complaint from a client.

So, no.  I don’t use Smashbox products.  I’d love to see other people stop using them, even if they have gotten their act together—I have no evidence either way.  To this day, walking into Sephora and seeing their displays makes me angry.

OMFG. Okay, I don’t use Smashbox makeup, but now I don’t think I ever will.

holy SHIT. i just started dipping my toes in the premium cosmetics waters so i’ve never used smashbox, but now there’s no way in hell i ever will.

Even though I don’t use makeup I’m fucking glad I got Olay foundation and Ben Nye finisher instead of the ‘Super great Smashbox’ stuff for my cosplay. Fuck that. 

I can’t really afford makeup that isn’t from the dollar store unless it’s a hand-me-down or someone buys it for me.

But one day, when I can afford to have a 3-day shopping craze at Square One, and I end up dedicating an entire day to Sephora, I will make sure to avoid Smashbox! I am so, so sorry you had to deal with that, OP. That’s literally corny-movie-villain evil. Like, wow, pathetic much?

Thanks for this post.

(Source: nomercles, via dykevibes)

GLITTER!

GLITTER!

(Source: makeupbyluna, via makeupftw)

Tags: makeup


“Is Drag the imitation of gender, or does it dramatize the signifying gestures through which gender itself is established? Does being female constitute a ‘natural fact,’ or a cultural performance, or is ‘naturalness’ constituted through discursively constrained performative acts that produce the body through and within the categories of sex?”
- Judith Butler, 1990 preface to Gender Trouble

“Is Drag the imitation of gender, or does it dramatize the signifying gestures through which gender itself is established? Does being female constitute a ‘natural fact,’ or a cultural performance, or is ‘naturalness’ constituted through discursively constrained performative acts that produce the body through and within the categories of sex?”

- Judith Butler, 1990 preface to Gender Trouble

(via anotherfeminist)

historicalslut:

lacigreen:

lipstickandligature:

drugstoreprincess:

Finally, a makeup advertisement addressing the fact that makeup is an ARTFORM, and isn’t only used to “hide your flaws”.

Oh my god Maybelline! Well fucking done! *raucous applause and whooping*

well…i certainly agree with the message.  makeup is a legitimate form of individual expression.  but i’m not about to get all bright eyed and bushy tailed for maybelline.

if it weren’t necessary for them to make $$ they wouldn’t be marketing makeup this way.  the beauty industry is more and more often exploiting the growing attempts to critique patriarchal expectations of female beauty.  these critiques threaten the success of these companies which, more often than not, thrive on body shame and sexism.  companies like maybelline only care about empowerment as long as is brings in the cashola.  the green.  the money, honey.

While I agree with everything above, the fact that these ads are not targeting women’s insecurities is shocking. It is a nice change from the bullshit ads saying if women wear makeup, they’ll get a hotter guy.

I love this.

(Source: lifeinthefastlaine, via lipsredasroses)

I need to get some yellow eyeshadow…

I need to get some yellow eyeshadow…

(Source: keepwalkinq)