Support Abundant Bodies at AMC2014
The Abundant Bodies track at the AMC this summer needs your help to support the work of fat activists with their workshops and activist organizing.
I’m part of two different sessions but there are so many amazing workshops and other activists who are coming to Detroit to talk about fat politics over the weekend. They all need financial support to not only get to the conference but also for lodging and other expenses over the weekend. 
via the funding campaign,
Some of the most well-known fat activists (including Dr. Charlotte Cooper, Amanda Levitt, Virgie Tovar) will be sharing their brilliance alongside up and coming young qtpoc fatties. Some of the topics and issues folks are exploring include race & fat activism, the “dangers” of excessive selfie consumptions, exploring fat & kink, building an inclusive fat community, body autonomy vs. body positivity, reimagining desirability, fat activism for unruly people, and so much more! 
From the program guide:

ln this track we will gather, share and celebrate the wisdom and abundance of our bodies. Abundant/thick/fat bodies are the target of so much hate, policing and negativity, even in our organizing communities. How do we unlearn mainstream ideas of what a body should look like and (re)-learn to celebrate the diversity, resilience, wisdom and beauty of all bodies? This track will explore these questions and create spaces to challenge the ongoing ways mainstream media shames and harms abundant bodies, to name fatphobia in our organizing and activism, and to create media and practical strategies for resistance, healing and community building. We will broaden the conversation around fat activism by centering this track on the voices of Indigenous, Black, people of color, dis/abled, super-sized, trans and queer fat folks. Through workshops, panels and skillshares we will transform mainstream ideas around abundant bodies and create resilient communities, media and art centred around abundant bodies!

Please support and share this campaign! There are a ton of awesome perks for donating too!

Support Abundant Bodies at AMC2014

The Abundant Bodies track at the AMC this summer needs your help to support the work of fat activists with their workshops and activist organizing.

I’m part of two different sessions but there are so many amazing workshops and other activists who are coming to Detroit to talk about fat politics over the weekend. They all need financial support to not only get to the conference but also for lodging and other expenses over the weekend. 

via the funding campaign,

Some of the most well-known fat activists (including Dr. Charlotte CooperAmanda LevittVirgie Tovar) will be sharing their brilliance alongside up and coming young qtpoc fatties. Some of the topics and issues folks are exploring include race & fat activism, the “dangers” of excessive selfie consumptions, exploring fat & kink, building an inclusive fat community, body autonomy vs. body positivity, reimagining desirability, fat activism for unruly people, and so much more! 

From the program guide:

ln this track we will gather, share and celebrate the wisdom and abundance of our bodies. Abundant/thick/fat bodies are the target of so much hate, policing and negativity, even in our organizing communities. How do we unlearn mainstream ideas of what a body should look like and (re)-learn to celebrate the diversity, resilience, wisdom and beauty of all bodies? This track will explore these questions and create spaces to challenge the ongoing ways mainstream media shames and harms abundant bodies, to name fatphobia in our organizing and activism, and to create media and practical strategies for resistance, healing and community building. We will broaden the conversation around fat activism by centering this track on the voices of Indigenous, Black, people of color, dis/abled, super-sized, trans and queer fat folks. Through workshops, panels and skillshares we will transform mainstream ideas around abundant bodies and create resilient communities, media and art centred around abundant bodies!

Please support and share this campaign! There are a ton of awesome perks for donating too!

redefiningbodyimage:

UMMMMM…no.
actofrebellion82:

militantwocs:

This is the bullshit white feminist line of thinking that deters WoC from joining the feminist movement.
It ignores 1) that women is a blanket term and that fact the women of color experience both sexism and racism 2) that the feminist movement is latent with racism.
And by trying to equate the oppressions, you actually undermine the history of racism and the existence of Women of Color.
Sexism does not affect everyone the same. Racism is not the same as Sexism, nor does it have the same consequences.  
“Suffering is not necessarily a fixed and universal experience that can be measured by a single rod: it is related to situations, needs, and aspirations. But there must be some historical and political parameters for the use of the term so that political priorities can be established and different forms and degrees of suffering can be given the most attention.”
Anyone that doesn’t realize this hasn’t fully examined the status of women of color in this society nor do the understand the basic assertions of functional feminism.

^^^ The bolded

redefiningbodyimage:

UMMMMM…no.

actofrebellion82:

militantwocs:

This is the bullshit white feminist line of thinking that deters WoC from joining the feminist movement.

It ignores 1) that women is a blanket term and that fact the women of color experience both sexism and racism 2) that the feminist movement is latent with racism.

And by trying to equate the oppressions, you actually undermine the history of racism and the existence of Women of Color.

Sexism does not affect everyone the same. Racism is not the same as Sexism, nor does it have the same consequences.  

“Suffering is not necessarily a fixed and universal experience that can be measured by a single rod: it is related to situations, needs, and aspirations. But there must be some historical and political parameters for the use of the term so that political priorities can be established and different forms and degrees of suffering can be given the most attention.”

Anyone that doesn’t realize this hasn’t fully examined the status of women of color in this society nor do the understand the basic assertions of functional feminism.

^^^ The bolded

(Source: feministfacts)

"White audiences are not the only ones that turn away from progressive images. Often unenlightened black and other nonwhite groups, who, like many whites, have been socially conditioned to accept denigrating portraits of black people are dissatisfied when they do no see these familiar stereotypes on screen."

— bell hooks

Ahem. Black folks, bell did just come for our wigs. When Black people DEMAND stereotypical depictions of Blackness and reject anything that deviates from the stereotypes (or the one-dimensional reaction to the stereotypes as “positive” characters) as “unrealistic,” there is a problem Houston. Internalized White supremacist thought is a helluva drug.

(via gradientlair)

On Being A “Social Justice Warrior”

gradientlair:

On Tumblr, and seriously on Tumblr and nowhere else, a Black person or other person of colour or member of any group often marginalized, is called a “social justice warrior” for discussing our very own lives and sociopolitical issues which directly impacts us, people we care about or the human condition itself. I’ve…not experienced this on Facebook (when I had one), Twitter, Blogger, Wordpress etc.

And, let’s be very clear here; there IS a different cultural ethos amidst Tumblr where many people are sharing fascinating writing—essays, stories, rants and incredibly important images, graphs, art and more that often speaks to a greater passion and/or intellect than connected use on other platforms. Twitter somewhat captures this, but content size constraints means that certain depths aren’t always reached. For this reason, I avidly use Twitter AND Tumblr, as their purposes overlap but aren’t identical. This differing cultural ethos on Tumblr means that a different type of cyber bully is born.

How racist Whites (and people of colour with internalized White supremacist thought) on Tumblr use the phrases “social justice” and “social justice warrior” mimics how sexist men (and women with internalized sexist thought) on Tumblr use the word “feminist.” They are uncomfortable with any challenge to the status quo (living our lives and writing about them in the way we do IS challenging the status quo; we’re supposed to co-sign bigotry that destroys us and many Black people [and others] refuse to do so) and are attempting to use what power they think they have to re-brand very normal labels into slurs. (Remember, racist, capitalism-obsessed Whites turned the words “communist” and “socialist” into slurs.)

In such instances, I am reminded of the words of James Baldwin:

You have not described me when you call me a nigger or when you call me a Negro leader. You have only described yourself.

When Whites and men go about the business of trying to negatively re-brand normal labels, they think they are reclaiming power from those who dared to…LIVE. (As if us daring to LIVE means that the White supremacist capitalist patriarchy that we live in has evaporated. They equate having hurt feelings over us rejecting bigotry as their “oppression.”) However, what they say about me is solely about themselves. It really is. It’s their issues…their problems with the realization of the full experiences that are outside of the status quo, and the pain they have at the reality that there’s no going back. (Notice how often Whites and men speak of “the good ol’ days,” which usually means fantasy over a time where fewer rights for people of colour and women were the norm.) And as for Tumblr, these types can’t stop people from writing and living; they can’t stop people from fighting for what’s important, by whatever means people feel is most prudent. They can’t even truly alter the climate of Tumblr. They’ve failed. So…what else to do but bully? What else to do but attempt to redefine terms so that people will run far away from them? That’s a “win” for some of them.

If a racist White person thinks calling me a “social justice warrior” is the friendly way of saying “nigger” or a man thinks calling me a “feminist” is the friendly way of saying “bitch,” again, that’s their problem. I’m not interested in dodging labels to make insecure people feel secure again. (Also, anyone who chooses not to use such labels for themselves have the right to said choice.) At the same time, I know that descriptors such as “passionate about social justice” (which is a bare bones inclusive term, and I clarifiy further when speaking of particular issues) and “Womanist” only scratch the surface of describing who I am, as they provide the ideological framework, but do not in detail describe who I am. They don’t know who I am because they don’t know who they are; at all. Many Whites and men cannot say who they are outside of what White privilege and male privilege has afforded them to believe. Who are they? They don’t know.

I know that speaking about racism, sexism and more that directly impacts my life, and writing essays about my life, the way White bloggers and male bloggers do all of the time—write about their lives—doesn’t make said story an abstract “social justice issue” and even me choosing to use such a tag to sort the post doesn’t invalidate the true, lived and real experiences of my life.

The ignorant, the inept, the reactionary, the status quo-loving, afraid to figure out just WHO they are types of people interested in using “social justice warrior” as a slur should find better hobbies. Their attempt to derail a train that’s been moving forward long before Tumblr existed, or before we young writers existed, is flawed and would be comical if it wasn’t so sad.

Related Post: A Predictable Reaction From Whites To Social Justice Writing

This. This. This. My fellow white people, read this shit. STOP reasserting your privilege by declaring anyone that is challenging it a social justice warrior. 

Racism and My Little Pony: A Critical Eye of Whiteness within MLP

blackfeministmanifesto:

loki-feelsmith:

chauvinistsushi:

Alright yes, I’m tired of sitting through this silently. I love MLP but it’s time to address the racefail.  And yes racism can manifest itself in something as “harmless” as children programs. That’s where our isms starts you guise. Let’s define whiteness. It’s not white people, but a lot of white people have it (it’s part of white privilege). It’s the essence of racism, of conquering, of invading the land and using it properly, of disregarding all other cultures as weird, of generalizing and isolating from cultures other than white.

First Zecora. She’s a zebra in a land of ponies. This is what she looks like. Her first appearance was in Bridle Gossip. This episode is suppose to be about how you shouldn’t spread rumors just because someone s different than you. Well here some classic feminism race fail. Zecora is suppose to represent “Africa”. She has a lovely African accent and a lovely story telling voice. She is name after what the Oromo people used to call zebras. Which is interesting and nice. But she rhymes the entire time and she’s the wise one and generally has this “Wise African” vibe about her. Is this empowering? No. It plays into an old and harmful stereotype that poc are used for knowledge. She also displays other habits and customs that are different from other ponies. This was suppose to help children understand that though she is different she deserves to be treated like everyone else. But this is what the creators of MLP did:

She is presented as just fucking weird with no rhyme or reason to her habits. She is “otherness” personified ponified. Is this respectful? No. For those of you who have never seen the rest of the episode, it involves the main characters basically breaking into her home. Tell her she is weird and that they are justified for their rumors cause she’s weird and her culture is scary. She laughs them off as silly ponies. Let me repeat that, they break into her home and disrespect her culture and she laughs it off. She is not sad, mad or even upset about any of this. This puts the expectation that poc when openly disrespected should not be angry, should be understanding and cater to the needs of white people. Is this what you want in your kids show? No.

Let’s talk about Spike. He’s a dragon who from birth was hatched and raised among ponies. He serves as an assistant to Twilight Sparkle. He often struggles with his identity because the ponies have never “studied” or interacted with dragons because they are too scary. He was so distraught about his ignorance about his heritage that he goes off to hang out with other dragons in Dragon Quest.

They are presented as uniformly loud, obnoxious, violent, mean and crude. And after a horrible raid of phoenix eggs. Spike and the ponies have decided that he can be himself (effiminate, nice, kind, generous and amiable). And to top it off he repeats the cycle of uprooting someone from a culture by taking an unhatched pheonix egg. His good attributes come only from being raised among ponies (which can be synonymous with white at this point). Let’s break this down. The creators have presented dragons —a creature culture that has had little interacting with ponies— as harmful, crude, and terrifying. They are also seen as greedy and selfish in Secret of My Excess; in this episode Spike goes through a growth stage where he displays “greediness”, hoarding, and hostility, all characteristics of normally associated with dragons

None of the ponies know why he’s doing this. They think he’s just being “greedy”. However, Spike displays the signs of any predatory animal. They never stopped to considered that his hoarding is meant for jewels which is the main diet of dragons. The hostility could be because dragons deal with, well other dragons who will take their food. A survival technique. But this is reduced to a battles of morals and dragon culture and habits are reduced to just being plain ol’ mean. If you think I’m being excessively intricate you have never seen MLP; it prides itself on consistency and intricacy.

The ponies are considered the opposite , even though they have gone through their own history of crudness and selfishness as seen in Hearth’s Warming Eve. In this episode, the ponies are divided and are, gasp, hateful. But this does not become a defining factor for them. They grow and their society becomes more peaceful.

How come the ponies are allowed to grow but dragons are always seen as terrifying and undiplomatic, and thus not worthy of becoming friends or at least form an acquaintanceship with pony society? How come Spike must give up his dragon heritage (evil, scary) and embrace being a pony (kind, reasonable)? Why was he given as an assitant at birth? Why can he not learn his heritage and still be a part of Ponyville? 

Now how does this relate to race? Spike is basically a representation of poc. Uprooted from his culture, he is placed into the dominant culture, denied any knowledge of his heritage, and all his good attributes are claimed to come from the dominant culture. Whiteness has settled quite nicely in MLP, as the ponies are considered “reasonable”, “make use of the land”, and encroach on other peoples’ creatures land and insult their respective cultures.

I love this show. It was hard to do this, but it is important. It is important to understand how these isms reach our children. It is important to stop this cycle of oppression. I cannot stand to champion this show for being feminist because it is a racist, white feminism. I cannot ignore these messages. Now please, Laren Faust et al., do better.

THANK YOU

and there’s more to address, but this is a GOOD bit of it!

This is why I am worried about wanting to cosplay Zecora.  I DON’T want to perpetuate a harmful stereotype, even if it WAS unintentional.

Whoa, crap. Remember when I wrote about a kid’s show?

vivalaevolucion:

White Man Kills a Black Couple with Kids because they asked him not to Shoot his guns while they were playing outside with kids

HAS EVERYONE SEEN THIS? This happened recently. The story goes that this father was playing outside with his kids and went to go talk to this guy(the white man), because he was shooting his guns  in the area where they were playing. The white man came over and shot him in the head FOR NO REASON. Did the same thing to the wife WHILE THE KIDS WERE WATCHING. Swear, white people don’t give a damn anymore about being discrete. This is why we need to tighten gun laws. This why we need to have a predominantly ethnic (People of Color) police force and investigation unit to combat this crap. We wonder why the Black Panther is calling for the death of George Zimmerman, but think about it. They grew up in a time where a white man could lynch you or kill you IN BROAD DAYLIGHT, and go about their  business as if nothing even happened. We are now devolving back to a time where prosperity, peace, and higher knowledge will not come because whites feel as if they are being oppressed (meaning they don’t get to be superior to people of color anymore *white tears*)

I need everyone to either reblog this post or copy and paste the link so we can bring national attention to this story. It’s about time we make this an issue.

(via reverseracism)

fuckyeahfeminists:

pangeasgarden:

“Black people need 2 see images of ourselves w/ humanity. women beautiful regardless of size, shape or complexion. men strong, sensitive & loving. parents & children caring & happy. couples in love in warm intimate moments. us as lovers, sensual & sexy but not nasty even when we’re nasty.”

–Saddi Khali

the early works and words of Saddi Khali…

yess

Tags: race photo art

Racism Talk

biggadjeworld:

Racial & Ethnic Slurs:

Slurs are exonyms for a particular race or ethnicity. They are pejoratives and are considered offensive due to their etymology or use in a historical context. They rarely come from our own languages & are not wanted as an identifier. Though some ethnic groups argue that “re-claiming” a slur is the best defense against it’s use, many may disagree. There can also be varying opinions within an ethnicity about just how offensive a slur can be.

No matter the etymology of a slur,
No matter an ethnic group’s views on “re-claiming” a slur,
No matter varying opinions on the offensiveness of a slur..

Don’t use it.
Don’t comment on it’s offensiveness if the slur does not apply to you.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied how they should feel about it’s use.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they should “re-claim” it.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they are being too “sensitive”.

No matter if people tell you they are not offended by a slur,
No matter if you have a “black friend”, “Asian friend”, or a “gypsy friend”,
No matter if you have read this, that, or the other about a slur,

Don’t use it.
Don’t comment on it’s offensiveness if the slur does not apply to you.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied how they should feel about it’s use.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they should “re-claim” it.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they are being too “sensitive”.

Don’t assume that because a slur is used within a particular ethnic community, that it is ever acceptable for those to whom it does not apply to use it.

Do:
Call people out on using a slur.
Inform people that a particular word is offensive.
Inform people that their speech is racist.
Tell people intent doesn’t matter.


Blatant Racism:

Blatant racism, in actions or speech, occurs when the race or ethnicity of an individual is obvious. People with white-passing privilege do not experience as much blatant racism. That does not mean they do not experience any racism, it just tends to exist more-so when their ethnicity or race becomes apparent.

When people discuss blatant racism that they have experienced,
When they discuss the existence of blatant racism,
When they discuss the notion that society is not post-racial,
When they discuss racism that they have experienced historically,

Don’t trivialize their experiences.
Don’t tell them they are looking for reasons to be angry or to complain.
Don’t tell them they go looking for racism.
Don’t tell them they are just being “negative”.
Don’t tell them that you understand if you truly do not.
Don’t tell them to “get over it”.
Don’t tell them that something was “in the past”.

Do:
Offer an ear to listen.
Validate their experiences.
Call out blatant racism.
Defend someone’s claims of blatant racism.


Subtle Racism

Subtle racism sometimes is only detected by those to whom it applies. It exists in words such as “gypped”, the use of “ghetto” by white Americans, sexualization, subtle race baiting in politics, talk about welfare, Affirmative Action, crime, less obvious stereotyping. It exists in our media and is far more prevalent than many white people realize. It exists in our society and every day lives far more than many white people realize.

When people discuss subtle racism,
When they discuss media and subtle racism,
When they mention race-baiting,
When people discuss stereotyping as it applies to their ethnicity,
When they discuss PoC representation,
When they discuss ethnic “characters”,
When they discuss sexualization.

Don’t trivialize how subtle racism affects them.
Don’t tell them they are being overly sensitive.
Don’t tell them they are reading into it too much.
Don’t tell them that it is “not that bad”.
Don’t tell them that they should not be offended.
Don’t tell people you understand if you truly do not.
Don’t tell them they are looking for reasons to complain.

Do:
Offer an ear to listen.
Call out subtle racism when you recognize it.
Validate their claims of subtle racism.
Respect that it does have a real impact on PoC ethnic groups.


Institutionalized Racism:
Still exists.

It exists in our education system. It exists when an individual’s personal racism has an affect on someone’s ability to get a job, get into college, get a bank loan. It is evident in the current statistics regarding American PoC, un-employment rates, homelessness, education levels, incarceration rates. It is still a very real form of racism that exists in America & Europe, among other places.

When people discuss institutionalized racism,
When they discuss how it affects them,
When they discuss racism in education,
When they discuss racism in the workplace,
When they suggest racism is why they did not get hired for a job,

Don’t trivialize their claims of institutionalized racism.
Don’t tell them they are being overly dramatic.
Don’t tell them they are looking for reasons to be angry.
Don’t tell them they are making excuses.
Don’t tell them we live in a post-racial society.
Don’t down play the achievements of PoC.

Do:
Listen & learn.
Educate yourself about the issue.
Recognize that it exists.
Validate claims of institutionalized racism.
Speak out against institutionalized racism.


Reverse Racism:
Does not exist.

Don’t use “reverse racism” to silence PoC who call you out on racist words or actions.
Don’t equate instances of bullying to racism, though bullying is never acceptable no matter the context.
Don’t say whatever you are about to say about “reverse racism” because we have already heard it all.


Know Your Privilege:

About Me:
I am a white-passing Romani woman.
I am straight.
I am the descendant of slaves.
I am the descendant of refugees.
I was poor during my childhood.
I have various serious health issues.
I have a long family history of generational poverty: on both sides of my family.
I am now middle class.
I am the first woman on one side of my family to graduate high school.

I have limited experience with blatant, in person racism.
I have much experience with racist cyber-bullying, racist comments, slurs, racism trivialization & ethnic sexualization.
I pass as white & do not know what life is like in dark skin.
I pass as white & therefore I have no personal experiences with institutionalized racism, though I am full well aware of how it does affect my ethnicity.

Know your own privileges & when your opinions are applicable or relevant.


Racism Talk:

Know when it is appropriate & inappropriate to offer your opinions on these issues.

Never trivialize racism.

Always call out racist words and actions.

If you are white, listen & learn about the real impacts of racism in today’s society and not just in a historical context.

Educate yourself.

Realize that we don’t owe you explanations about racism.
Realize that we have a right to be angry when you do or say something racist.
Realize that intent doesn’t matter: racism is racism & slurs are always hurtful.

To learn more & read more in-depth about racism, stereotyping & privilege, visit Racism School.

(Source: big-gadje-world, via reverseracism)

sincerelysarita:

#the struggle is real 

(Source: rakumari, via heavenrants)

subconciousevolution:

“Flesh-colored;” “Nude”

The centrality of whiteness cannot be ignored when words likes flesh-colored and nude are used to describe light tan/beige even in the context of a darker-skinned woman.

The same thing happened to the first lady [source].

(via casual-isms)

Read This Week

gradientlair:

This is my 19th Read This Week feature! I read some excellent articles recently! Check these out:

The Glorification of White Crime by iambutchsolo on Tumblr is an EXQUISITE essay and analysis of how white privilege allows white criminals in media (whether drama or true life) to be portrayed as nuanced, complex individuals, not shells of pure evil. This essay GOES IN. And, as someone who is a fan of Dexter (one of the shows mentioned), but also watches television with a CRITICAL EYE, I 100% agree with what is presented in this essay.

An Open Letter To Abigal Fisher by Evette Donne on Clutch is excellent. Perfect. In case the name Abigail Fisher doesn’t ring a bell to you (which I doubt by now, but just in case), check out her case Fisher vs. The University of Texas.

The Impossibility of Race-Blind Admissions by Inimai M. Chettiar and Roopal Patel on The Atlantic is a good read. This article also deals with the Abigal Fisher case.  They write: “On the surface, Fisher vs. UT asks a simple question: Is it constitutional for a university to consider race when evaluating an applicant’s personal background? But underneath this question is a deeper one: Can a student’s racial background race really be separated from who he or she is as an applicant and a human being?”

Saving The Boobies Will Not Save Me by Jazmine Walker on RH Reality Check is GREAT. She discusses how the sexualization of the “pink” campaign is not meeting the needs or addressing the severity of breast cancer for Black women. She writes: “Talking about breasts as if they are an independent entity, as if it’s the breasts that are worth saving as opposed to the life and body they are attached to is not only patriarchal, but also down right sexist.” All I have to say to this article is YASSSSSSSS. She went IN! Brilliant, nuanced piece.

The Politics of Curviness and White Womanhood by Robert Reece is a great read. He writes: “Before attaching some type of privilege to the title ‘diva’ and the characterization ‘curvy,’ recognize your white privilege and consider pointing a finger at the patriarchal faces of men who institutionalize these beauty standards by only casting certain types of women for roles under the guise that audiences only want to see thin, fair skinned women with long, flowing hair.” READ THIS.

Stay tuned for next week’s suggestions!

gradientlair:

Aaaand this illustration covers quite a bit. Toni already told us though… 
Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge.
The daily battles of White privilege and microaggressions…

gradientlair:

Aaaand this illustration covers quite a bit. Toni already told us though… 

Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge.

The daily battles of White privilege and microaggressions…

White Women and White Privilege

gradientlair:

I love how I am supposed to pretend that racism is only facilitated through the speech and actions of White men, that only White men have White privilege, and that only White men benefit from White supremacy in our society.

Intersectionality fail.

When I used to blog on Wordpress a couple of years ago, there was a White woman who got really angry about one of my posts. I mentioned that I don’t like when people create an entire blog post just to say why they have been gone from their blog (especially when nothing eventful happened in the hiatus). Nobody cares. Just come back with a great post or photo. Then we care again. When a popular White male business blogger named Chris Brogan mentioned the same thing (which I found out after my post), everyone cheered of course. Yet I did, and this woman came to snatch my wig!

She blogged layers of insults (and used my name in the post) and got other mediocre (and I say this based on the content I saw on their blogs, not just to be mean) bloggers to cosign with her. What’s interesting is a few White male bloggers started following my blog or commented/emailed me to tell me that they agreed with my point (probably because they saw the same point mentioned on Brogan’s blog back then). However, other White women cyber high-fived her; called me “spoiled” and “privileged.” What?

All of this over a post that I really didn’t think was even remotely controversial, especially compared to what I blog now?

She included a photo of a monkey on a keyboard as the photo to accompany the article. I reported this to WordPress, and in Tumblr’s style, of course they ignored this. Now, if a White male had done this, it would be deemed racist and outrageous by some, though of course WordPress would’ve still done nothing.

I’ve said this over and over but ultimately, my day to day problems are with White women and their microaggressions and lack of recognition of White privilege and Black men with their street harassment. This is the Monday through Sunday type of stuff. And again, this does not mean that ideologies, systems and institutions in a White supremacist capitalist patriarchal society that primarily benefit wealthy, heterosexual, able-bodied White men do not also hurt me. These aren’t mutually exclusive. I’m simply talking about daily social interactions. Daily. DAILY.

I keep thinking about the negative racialized statements from the likes of Tina Fey, Lina Dunham and Ashley Judd that I am supposed to ignore because these women make White women feel empowered. Please.

Like one of my sisters (literally a relative, not figuratively) wrote:

Black Feminists and Womanists are Black and Female at all times 24/7 we do not choose to be Black in the day time and women at night.

When I encounter White women who truly understand racism, White privilege, and microagressions, who are consistently trying to unpack, deconstruct, challenge and change these, it’s somewhat relieving. However, even some who identify as feminists aren’t embracing feminism intersectionally.

I won’t even mention the current headache of Abigail Fisher and white privilege. So many other bloggers have got this one covered, and have written about it so well.

Related Posts: My Experiences With White People and Social Media, No, It’s Not Magically “Great” Because Someone White Did It, Microaggressions 2.0

Western Feminism is Wrong

tmihijabi:

First and foremost, I’d like to start with the caveat that feminism per se is not flawed. I am specifically talking about Western feminism.

Western Feminism is based on the false notion that the main struggle in society is male vs. female. It’s easy to understand how this ideology took shape when we look at the founders and sustainers of Western Feminism - a group of (mostly) women whose only form of oppression has been experienced because of gender. But this is not true for the majority of the world, where the main struggles are often those of economic class, race, tribe, caste, religious identity, political identity, and so forth. In short, if you believe a Sikh woman living in New York City is only oppressed by her gender, then you’re off your rocker.

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(via whitefeministcollectionagency)

Western Feminism is Wrong

tmihijabi:

First and foremost, I’d like to start with the caveat that feminism per se is not flawed. I am specifically talking about Western feminism.

Western Feminism is based on the false notion that the main struggle in society is male vs. female. It’s easy to understand how this ideology took shape when we look at the founders and sustainers of Western Feminism - a group of (mostly) women whose only form of oppression has been experienced because of gender. But this is not true for the majority of the world, where the main struggles are often those of economic class, race, tribe, caste, religious identity, political identity, and so forth. In short, if you believe a Sikh woman living in New York City is only oppressed by her gender, then you’re off your rocker.

Read More