so-treu:

well, since we ARE talking about hugo and since that article/topic of Why Misogynists Make Great Informants: How Gender Violence on the Left Enables State Violence in Radical Movements just came up i guess it would be a good time to make this post…..

i came across this exchange b/c i follow Ali Abdunimah on twitter (As far as i know know no one else has commented on it), who is, to quite wiki, a “Palestinian American journalist and co-founder of Electronic Intifada, a not-for-profit, independent online publication about the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.” and i’m by no means an expert in this area so there may be some problematic things about him as well that i’m unaware of but as far as i know he’s kind of the shit.

now remember waaaaay back in 2011 when the Freedom Flotilla 2 was sailing from greece to Gaza in an attempt to break the blockade and had a few random people on board like oh Alice Walker and Jody Williams and Mairead Maguire and Shirin Ebadi, you know, women who haved one that whole fighting for the rights of marginalized women *thing* (what might you call it? femi…..feminiz…..) for significant portions of their lives? remember that? and this was after a similar attempt in 2010 resulted in the murder of nine activists by the IDF.

now there’s this asswipe guy named Joshua Travino who used to be a speechwriter for bush jr who has himself a twitter and when the flotilla was on it’s way he tweeted: “Dear IDF: If you end up shooting any Americans on the new Gaza flotilla – well, most Americans are cool with that. Including me.” 

when called out for endorsing the killing of americans overseas, he stuck to his guns like superglue, saying: “Sure, if they adhere to our enemies. Flotilla participants do.” he also compared the flotilla to a “nazi convoy.”

a real fucking charmer.

then, AFTER this goes down, The Guardian decides to hire Travino as a correspondent for US politics. which makes about as much sense as hugo being a feminist writer makes a lot of people go “FUCK that shit” and a campaign starts for the Guardian to fire Travino, and Abdunimah is one of the leading voices (read that link if you want the full story).

so amidst all these calls for the guardian to get a fucking grip and at least act like they had journalistic integrity just act, mr. lone voice of reason in the era of callout internet culture decides to pipe up and………you guessed it, defend Travino. the guy who is not only ok with israel’s brutal oppression of Gaza BUT IS ALSO OKAY WITH KILLING PEOPLE, SPECIFICALLY WOMEN, WHO WOULD DARE OPPOSE IT, EVEN IF IT’S THROUGH “NON-VIOLENT” MEANS (scare quotes around “non-violent” b/c i mean many of us are inherently implicated in violence around the world even if we’re not personally beating people or something in our neighborhoods but all Walker and co. had with them ont he boat was medicine and books, just some fucking medicine and books and he thinks they should be killed for that)…..THIS IS THE GUY HUGO IS STANDING BEHIND. BECAUSE ISRAEL’S SELF DEFENSE FROM SOME FUCKING BOOKS. BECAUSE ONLINE TAKEDOWN CULTURE IS JUST SOOOOO BAD BUT NOT WORSE THAN CALLING FOR WOMEN TO DIE BECAUSE THEY DON’T AGREE WITH YOU.

DO YOU SEE THE COMMON THREAD HERE.

i mean a feminist who is okay with a man calling for the death of women WHO ARE ALSSO FEMINISTS because they think oppression is unjust IS NOT A FEMINIST.

i guess unless he protected you from those scary black women that one time who were mad at you for putting racist imagery in your book. or telling the brown woman who called you out for stealing her work “you’d better prove it.”

tl:dr; hugo is only still a factor because white f*eminists are horrible people. and as long as they are the one’s who got a target on their backs they cool.

and Abdunimah works his BS detector real quick and it’r real interesting to see who hugo feels the need to vaguely label as a threat and who he just kinda slinks away from (as far as i can tell he never responded after Abdunimah brought up him being The Worst).

(via whitefeministcollectionagency)

"It’s disingenuous to suggest that white women don’t have it easier in the media; they are more likely to be held up as ‘figureheads’, ‘speaking for us all’ as women. But we’re not all the same. Angela Carter hit the nail on the head when she said: “The notion of a universality of human experience is a confidence trick and the notion of a universality of female experience is a clever confidence trick”. I doubt whether a black Caitlin Moran or Lena Dunham could be as immensely popular with both the media and the public alike. This is not an attack on them; in many ways, I like what they do – I may question some of their choices, but this is not an ‘all or nothing’ form of support. But just because I may like aspects of what they do doesn’t mean I should blindly support them when I see them ignoring and dismissing valid concerns raised by other feminists who are also trying to make their marginalised voices heard. There was one really problematic article written in defence of Moran that I want to talk about here, but before I do, I want raise another issue. I’ve seen various people write that this is ‘infighting’, and that such debates ‘fracture’ the feminist movement. I think this is bullshit. We should be allowed to disagree; we are, after all, human beings with different life experiences and opinions. If the only way for feminists to work together is to constantly agree, that seems rather fascist to me. And also very unrealistic. Besides, I think disagreements can be incredibly useful in highlighting problems that need to be addressed and allowing marginalised voices to be heard. We don’t need ‘leaders’, held up and fawned over by media, to allow debate about equality and gender to flourish. The idea of holding up individual feminists like Moran or Dunham as some ‘figureheads’ of the movement seems counter-productive to me."

le projet d’amour: On Feminism: Intersectionality (via usa-ko)

(via plastickitten-deactivated201304)

theuntitledmag:

[image: Lady Gaga, a white celebrity, is show walking down the runway in a niqab. The image has a blue hue. Big yellow words read: “STOP APPROPRIATING”]
Find out what Wided has to say about Lady Gaga and other white feminists who appropriate her culture.

“The argument that I need someone else, someone outside of my culture and religion, to tell me how to feel about certain aspects of my individuality is the continuation of a long legacy of colonialism and ethnocentrism. Full stop.”

theuntitledmag:

[image: Lady Gaga, a white celebrity, is show walking down the runway in a niqab. The image has a blue hue. Big yellow words read: “STOP APPROPRIATING”]

Find out what Wided has to say about Lady Gaga and other white feminists who appropriate her culture.

“The argument that I need someone else, someone outside of my culture and religion, to tell me how to feel about certain aspects of my individuality is the continuation of a long legacy of colonialism and ethnocentrism. Full stop.”

Random Notes about Racism and White Feminism

fatbodypolitics:

Last night I was discussing white feminism after a tweet from Sandra Fluke about how we don’t talk about poverty in America. She linked to was a release from Legal Momentum that talked about poverty based on gender without acknowledging the racial divide between poverty rates of WOC and white women. This is a really good example of how white feminists like Fluke completely erase the experience of WOC and treat the category of “women” as a homogeneous group. (Click photo to see the tweet / release)

I’m really sick of the idea that white cis-gendered middle / upper class thin white women’s issues are treated like the default within the feminist movement and this kind of continual erasure of experience is incredibly harmful for all women who do not fit into that category. 

I also started receiving a few responses from people about this (Why I stopped trusting white liberals) post that I reblogged last night. I’m starting to see a pattern in response to posts like this where my fellow white people want to push away from authors who want to treat white racism as a problem with all white people but completely ignore the content of the post. This form of distancing from racism is incredibly problematic because instead of addressing the horrible acts that other white people are doing we try to distance ourselves from it. We really need to start acknowledging when we do that we become part of the problem. We don’t get cookies when we are derailing a conversation about racism because we don’t feel comfortable being lumped into a category with other white people. If we were actually trying to work against racism this wouldn’t be the first action we wanted to take, instead we would probably accept that we do live in and benefit from racism. Work against that.

I also just got this response from an anon. I’m going to use it as an example of what a better response would be to these situations.

This will be several asks long. I apologize. I have been thinking about the activity on your twitter/tumblr last night a lot today, and interrogating my own response to it. My first instinct was offense and protestation. I wanted to say, “hey, I’m not racist!” And then I realized how absurd that is. It is not enough to say that I am not a racist, that I don’t hate people of color. I don’t have to be spouting hateful racist ideology in order to be participating in a system of racism.

We are all participating in widespread, systemic racism. We are all consumers of an entertainment industry and news media that is racist (and size-ist/classist/able-ist/sexist). I don’t know that it’s possible to grow up in America without internalizing racial stereotypes. It is important, I think, to acknowledge those seeds of racism that have unconsciously sprouted inside of us, to examine them, admit our white privilege and bias, and actively work to pull them. Like weeds.

If, as a white person, you hear someone’s experience with racism, your first response is to be angrily defensive and feel attacked, I think there is more internal work to be done. We live in a society of freedom, but not one of equality. To deny that is fail to look outside of your sphere of privilege and acknowledge the struggles of others. In fact, I challenge fellow white folk to consider their mental images of various archetypes: a beautiful woman, a rich man, a smart person, a criminal and then consider what the images they come up with say about our culture and their own perception of race and class. Racism is not a thing of the past. And to take offense to the fact that it is not just present but prevalent, and to the fact that white privilege exists is to, in my opinion, dismiss and deny the pain and work that our brothers and sisters of color experience. Why do we think racism is all about spouting racial slurs? It’s so often just remaining silent. 

So I would like to thank you, honestly, for how you refused to remain silent last night. It challenged me to think deeply about my own reactions, and to realize that I, myself, can do more.

Just a side note, I don’t need to be thanked for talking about this. There are way cooler WOC who talk about this stuff daily. I just don’t think they should be the ones who have to constantly put themselves out there. White people need to start speaking up about the racism we perpetuate on a regular basis. 

I was thinking about posts to put on WFCA thought I would reblog it here again too.

(via whitefeministcollectionagency)

Before and Afro - Still a White Privilege Denier

whitefeministcollectionagency:

This was already blogged about here, but the blogger wrote a craptastic response to her blog.

For all you “allies” go and read the bullshit ignorant response that she wrote, she probably would get a BINGO on a white privilege denier bingo card. (Allies is in scare quotes because I think it is a really conflicted space to take up. A lot of ignorance and white privilege denial comes from that space.)

I would also read the responses. There are almost 100, some are bad, but many are great responses to understand why things like this are so harmful. 

Just like the blogger we all need to educate ourselves about racism.

"

But the Euro-American feminists, being part of the dominant culture, deal with Hispanic women - and other racial/ethnic women - differently from the way they deal with each other. They take for granted that feminism in the USA is THEIR garden, and therefore they will decide what manner of work racial/ethnic women will do there.

By the time I began to experience all this, I had learned much about the dynamics of oppression and prejudice and I could understand what was going on. However, what took me totally by surprise was the inability or unwillingness of the Euro-American feminists to acknowledge their prejudice.

Most feminists ‘believe that because they are feminists, they cannot be racists.’ Euro-American feminists, like all liberals, sooner or later, have come to the point at which they are willing to ‘acknowledge that racism exists, reluctantly of course, but nobody admits to being a racist.’

While whitewashing - pun intended - their personal sins of racism/ethnic prejudice in the restful waters of guilt, they continue to control access to power within the movement. Euro-American feminists need to understand that as long as they refuse to recognize that oppressive power-over is an intrinsic element of their racism/ethnic prejudice, they will continue to do violence to feminism.

"

— Ada María Isasi-Díaz, “A Hispanic Garden in a Foreign Land,” Mujerista Theology. (via lo-cotidiano)

(via whitefeministcollectionagency)

I really other white feminists to stop crying sexism when people like Lena Dunham are criticized for doing racist things.

(Source: whitefeministcollectionagency)

Please Submit to WFCA

whitefeministcollectionagency:

I’m only one person so I will need all of the help I can get please take the time to submit interactions, stories and examples of where white feminists are supporting racism through their work. 

I started a new tumblr

White Feminist Collection Agency. It’s time we stop expecting women of color to deal with our racist bullshit.

And today at the White Feminist Collection Agency..

As white feminists could we stop using racist tropes and expect others to give the burden of proof for our actions. This line of conversation is become all too common place where the idea that someone is able to decide that racism is or isn’t real.

To see the all of the comments look on twitter @cristinapage. These are only a few of almost an hour of interaction between the OP and other people on twitter where she not only dismissed the comments about why the photo is racist but continually expected everyone else to educate her about it.

(The time stamp on the tweets are not the same bc they were taken at different times)

Random Notes about Racism and White Feminism

Last night I was discussing white feminism after a tweet from Sandra Fluke about how we don’t talk about poverty in America. She linked to was a release from Legal Momentum that talked about poverty based on gender without acknowledging the racial divide between poverty rates of WOC and white women. This is a really good example of how white feminists like Fluke completely erase the experience of WOC and treat the category of “women” as a homogeneous group. (Click photo to see the tweet / release)

I’m really sick of the idea that white cis-gendered middle / upper class thin white women’s issues are treated like the default within the feminist movement and this kind of continual erasure of experience is incredibly harmful for all women who do not fit into that category. 

I also started receiving a few responses from people about this (Why I stopped trusting white liberals) post that I reblogged last night. I’m starting to see a pattern in response to posts like this where my fellow white people want to push away from authors who want to treat white racism as a problem with all white people but completely ignore the content of the post. This form of distancing from racism is incredibly problematic because instead of addressing the horrible acts that other white people are doing we try to distance ourselves from it. We really need to start acknowledging when we do that we become part of the problem. We don’t get cookies when we are derailing a conversation about racism because we don’t feel comfortable being lumped into a category with other white people. If we were actually trying to work against racism this wouldn’t be the first action we wanted to take, instead we would probably accept that we do live in and benefit from racism. Work against that.

I also just got this response from an anon. I’m going to use it as an example of what a better response would be to these situations.

This will be several asks long. I apologize. I have been thinking about the activity on your twitter/tumblr last night a lot today, and interrogating my own response to it. My first instinct was offense and protestation. I wanted to say, “hey, I’m not racist!” And then I realized how absurd that is. It is not enough to say that I am not a racist, that I don’t hate people of color. I don’t have to be spouting hateful racist ideology in order to be participating in a system of racism.

We are all participating in widespread, systemic racism. We are all consumers of an entertainment industry and news media that is racist (and size-ist/classist/able-ist/sexist). I don’t know that it’s possible to grow up in America without internalizing racial stereotypes. It is important, I think, to acknowledge those seeds of racism that have unconsciously sprouted inside of us, to examine them, admit our white privilege and bias, and actively work to pull them. Like weeds.

If, as a white person, you hear someone’s experience with racism, your first response is to be angrily defensive and feel attacked, I think there is more internal work to be done. We live in a society of freedom, but not one of equality. To deny that is fail to look outside of your sphere of privilege and acknowledge the struggles of others. In fact, I challenge fellow white folk to consider their mental images of various archetypes: a beautiful woman, a rich man, a smart person, a criminal and then consider what the images they come up with say about our culture and their own perception of race and class. Racism is not a thing of the past. And to take offense to the fact that it is not just present but prevalent, and to the fact that white privilege exists is to, in my opinion, dismiss and deny the pain and work that our brothers and sisters of color experience. Why do we think racism is all about spouting racial slurs? It’s so often just remaining silent. 

So I would like to thank you, honestly, for how you refused to remain silent last night. It challenged me to think deeply about my own reactions, and to realize that I, myself, can do more.

Just a side note, I don’t need to be thanked for talking about this. There are way cooler WOC who talk about this stuff daily. I just don’t think they should be the ones who have to constantly put themselves out there. White people need to start speaking up about the racism we perpetuate on a regular basis. 

White womans struggle vs. Black womans struggle

sluteverbabe:

White women: 

  • Deal with all the hateful oppressive shit the patriarchy throws @ them based on their gender aka sexism

Black Women:

  • Deal with all the hatefull oppressive shit the patriarchy AND racist society throws @ us based on both our gender and race aka racism and sexism

There are also a bunch of other things not accounted for in this very basic ass explanation, such as sexual orientation, ability (mental and physical) class, gender identity etc. which greatly influence this very real struggle 

alll oppression is connected but not all oppression is the same, so although we may fight similar struggles we have to respect that some of the oppressions we face are very different from others and give those room to voice our struggle without derailing bullshit

“I am not free while any woman is unfree, even when her shackles are very different from my own.”- Audre Lorde 

(Source: plantaplanta)

A Statement

communityandresistance:

for a while i hadn’t been wanting to talk about rape discourse within mainstream feminism. one might say i was afraid.

rape is such a sensitive topic. & i felt i would be trivializing it if i talked about what had been on my mind since i came out with the fact that i myself was raped.

which is, that mainstream feminism does a fucking sucky job at examining the politics of rape with in [T]Woc communities and men also.

i was scared to tell white rape survivors, that [T]WoC need space in the survivor conversation as well. that they are dominating it. that they need to recognize [T]WoC are raped at higher rates. that they cannot claim to have survivor solidarity with [T]WoC if they continue to ignore that mainstream feminism is shitty. but as Woc rape survivor, I can no longer worry about white fee fees. i can no longer worry about those who get the most attention, the most services, the most comfort. 

yes, i know, rape culture affects EVERYONE. & makes it so survivors’ experiences aren’t affirmed and we are blamed for our own violation. we all deal with triggers. we all deal with trying to get our lives back. 

but WoC aren’t even seen as victims. ever. we’re always impure. always dirty. always hypersexual. always hoes. white womyn dont have to deal with that. we’re starting from scratch. 

[T]WoC’s suffering from sexual violence will never be accurately recognized until we are recognized throughly as human beings with basic needs & emotions. & mainstream feminism refuses to do that. we will continue to be murdered, raped, and beaten because it is profitable for the US. Mainstream feminism has shown that they side with US imperialism and politics, therefore, white feminists and others who engage in mainstream feminism as is are complicit within [T]WoC’s death and suffering. they are NOT in solidarity with [T]WoC survivors and I can no longer be in solidarity with those who refuse to criticize and complicate mainstream feminism. This is why this blog is crucial, it is important for us to connect with each other, to create spaces where we are resist in our existence, where can talk about the failings of mainstream feminism, where we carve out our own space based on recognizing and affirming each other’s experiences, humanity, and identities. 

with that being sad, i’d just like to say what a rewarding experience for me (& I’m sure all of the other admins) to facilitate this space. thank you all for following. please continue to spread the word. if you feel comfortable, please submit suggestions, critiques, pictures of yourself doing self-care, tips, or stories, and send us questions! You may submit or ask anonymously. 

sending love and encouragement to you all.

hiphopcheerleader

(via afrafemme)