Racism Talk

biggadjeworld:

Racial & Ethnic Slurs:

Slurs are exonyms for a particular race or ethnicity. They are pejoratives and are considered offensive due to their etymology or use in a historical context. They rarely come from our own languages & are not wanted as an identifier. Though some ethnic groups argue that “re-claiming” a slur is the best defense against it’s use, many may disagree. There can also be varying opinions within an ethnicity about just how offensive a slur can be.

No matter the etymology of a slur,
No matter an ethnic group’s views on “re-claiming” a slur,
No matter varying opinions on the offensiveness of a slur..

Don’t use it.
Don’t comment on it’s offensiveness if the slur does not apply to you.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied how they should feel about it’s use.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they should “re-claim” it.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they are being too “sensitive”.

No matter if people tell you they are not offended by a slur,
No matter if you have a “black friend”, “Asian friend”, or a “gypsy friend”,
No matter if you have read this, that, or the other about a slur,

Don’t use it.
Don’t comment on it’s offensiveness if the slur does not apply to you.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied how they should feel about it’s use.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they should “re-claim” it.
Don’t tell people to whom it is applied that they are being too “sensitive”.

Don’t assume that because a slur is used within a particular ethnic community, that it is ever acceptable for those to whom it does not apply to use it.

Do:
Call people out on using a slur.
Inform people that a particular word is offensive.
Inform people that their speech is racist.
Tell people intent doesn’t matter.


Blatant Racism:

Blatant racism, in actions or speech, occurs when the race or ethnicity of an individual is obvious. People with white-passing privilege do not experience as much blatant racism. That does not mean they do not experience any racism, it just tends to exist more-so when their ethnicity or race becomes apparent.

When people discuss blatant racism that they have experienced,
When they discuss the existence of blatant racism,
When they discuss the notion that society is not post-racial,
When they discuss racism that they have experienced historically,

Don’t trivialize their experiences.
Don’t tell them they are looking for reasons to be angry or to complain.
Don’t tell them they go looking for racism.
Don’t tell them they are just being “negative”.
Don’t tell them that you understand if you truly do not.
Don’t tell them to “get over it”.
Don’t tell them that something was “in the past”.

Do:
Offer an ear to listen.
Validate their experiences.
Call out blatant racism.
Defend someone’s claims of blatant racism.


Subtle Racism

Subtle racism sometimes is only detected by those to whom it applies. It exists in words such as “gypped”, the use of “ghetto” by white Americans, sexualization, subtle race baiting in politics, talk about welfare, Affirmative Action, crime, less obvious stereotyping. It exists in our media and is far more prevalent than many white people realize. It exists in our society and every day lives far more than many white people realize.

When people discuss subtle racism,
When they discuss media and subtle racism,
When they mention race-baiting,
When people discuss stereotyping as it applies to their ethnicity,
When they discuss PoC representation,
When they discuss ethnic “characters”,
When they discuss sexualization.

Don’t trivialize how subtle racism affects them.
Don’t tell them they are being overly sensitive.
Don’t tell them they are reading into it too much.
Don’t tell them that it is “not that bad”.
Don’t tell them that they should not be offended.
Don’t tell people you understand if you truly do not.
Don’t tell them they are looking for reasons to complain.

Do:
Offer an ear to listen.
Call out subtle racism when you recognize it.
Validate their claims of subtle racism.
Respect that it does have a real impact on PoC ethnic groups.


Institutionalized Racism:
Still exists.

It exists in our education system. It exists when an individual’s personal racism has an affect on someone’s ability to get a job, get into college, get a bank loan. It is evident in the current statistics regarding American PoC, un-employment rates, homelessness, education levels, incarceration rates. It is still a very real form of racism that exists in America & Europe, among other places.

When people discuss institutionalized racism,
When they discuss how it affects them,
When they discuss racism in education,
When they discuss racism in the workplace,
When they suggest racism is why they did not get hired for a job,

Don’t trivialize their claims of institutionalized racism.
Don’t tell them they are being overly dramatic.
Don’t tell them they are looking for reasons to be angry.
Don’t tell them they are making excuses.
Don’t tell them we live in a post-racial society.
Don’t down play the achievements of PoC.

Do:
Listen & learn.
Educate yourself about the issue.
Recognize that it exists.
Validate claims of institutionalized racism.
Speak out against institutionalized racism.


Reverse Racism:
Does not exist.

Don’t use “reverse racism” to silence PoC who call you out on racist words or actions.
Don’t equate instances of bullying to racism, though bullying is never acceptable no matter the context.
Don’t say whatever you are about to say about “reverse racism” because we have already heard it all.


Know Your Privilege:

About Me:
I am a white-passing Romani woman.
I am straight.
I am the descendant of slaves.
I am the descendant of refugees.
I was poor during my childhood.
I have various serious health issues.
I have a long family history of generational poverty: on both sides of my family.
I am now middle class.
I am the first woman on one side of my family to graduate high school.

I have limited experience with blatant, in person racism.
I have much experience with racist cyber-bullying, racist comments, slurs, racism trivialization & ethnic sexualization.
I pass as white & do not know what life is like in dark skin.
I pass as white & therefore I have no personal experiences with institutionalized racism, though I am full well aware of how it does affect my ethnicity.

Know your own privileges & when your opinions are applicable or relevant.


Racism Talk:

Know when it is appropriate & inappropriate to offer your opinions on these issues.

Never trivialize racism.

Always call out racist words and actions.

If you are white, listen & learn about the real impacts of racism in today’s society and not just in a historical context.

Educate yourself.

Realize that we don’t owe you explanations about racism.
Realize that we have a right to be angry when you do or say something racist.
Realize that intent doesn’t matter: racism is racism & slurs are always hurtful.

To learn more & read more in-depth about racism, stereotyping & privilege, visit Racism School.

(Source: big-gadje-world, via reverseracism)

subconciousevolution:

“Flesh-colored;” “Nude”

The centrality of whiteness cannot be ignored when words likes flesh-colored and nude are used to describe light tan/beige even in the context of a darker-skinned woman.

The same thing happened to the first lady [source].

(via casual-isms)

"Not being racist is not some default starting position. You don’t simply get to say you’re not a racist; not being racist — or a sexist or a homophobe — is a constant, arduous process of unlearning, of being uncomfortable, of eating crow and being humbled and re-evaluating. It’s probably hard to start that process if you’ve been told that every thought you have is golden and should be given voice, and that people who are offended by what you say are hypersensitive simpletons."

PostBourgie (via sugaryumyum, meow-sense)

brazenbitch:

Whiteness is nothing to be proud of. When you say you’re proud to be white this is what we PoC think of:

Things to be proud of:

  • Your heritage,family traditions/history,food,music etc.
  • but never whiteness
  • because whiteness is a history of…

(Source: plantaplanta)